Nuclear Energy UK – ABWR http://abwr.org/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 15:51:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://abwr.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Nuclear Energy UK – ABWR http://abwr.org/ 32 32 Britain “may overtake EU in hydrogen race” https://abwr.org/britain-may-overtake-eu-in-hydrogen-race/ https://abwr.org/britain-may-overtake-eu-in-hydrogen-race/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/britain-may-overtake-eu-in-hydrogen-race/ Germany, however, could struggle to produce green hydrogen, Alverà added. “Today Germany runs on coal, nuclear and diesel and doesn’t get much sun. It has access to the wind … [but] it is nothing like the UK or Ireland. And the Germans don’t want onshore wind because it’s … very densely populated. The director general […]]]>

Germany, however, could struggle to produce green hydrogen, Alverà added.

“Today Germany runs on coal, nuclear and diesel and doesn’t get much sun. It has access to the wind … [but] it is nothing like the UK or Ireland. And the Germans don’t want onshore wind because it’s … very densely populated.

The director general of Snam continued: “Germany must therefore get out of coal, get out of nuclear power, get out of diesel. It has to import massive amounts of renewable energy.

If the UK becomes a leader in hydrogen production, Germany could depend on Britain for much of its renewable energy, Mr Alverà said.

Last month, the government pledged to unlock £ 4 billion in hydrogen investments as part of Boris Johnson’s 10-point plan for a ‘green industrial revolution’.

Ministers said a UK-wide hydrogen economy could support 9,000 jobs by 2030 with the energy source powering transport, heavy industry and homes.

Government analysis suggests that just over a third of the UK’s energy use could be hydrogen-based by 2050.

Mr Alverà said that a network of pipelines under the North Sea, originally built to transport natural gas, would give the UK an added advantage: “[It’s] like Disney.


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The Minister’s commitment to new nuclear power follows the Lancashire workers’ lobby in Parliament. https://abwr.org/the-ministers-commitment-to-new-nuclear-power-follows-the-lancashire-workers-lobby-in-parliament/ https://abwr.org/the-ministers-commitment-to-new-nuclear-power-follows-the-lancashire-workers-lobby-in-parliament/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 08:35:27 +0000 https://abwr.org/the-ministers-commitment-to-new-nuclear-power-follows-the-lancashire-workers-lobby-in-parliament/ Fylde MP Mark Menzies asked the minister about accelerating plans to build new nuclear power plants to preserve skilled jobs. It comes as the UK’s aging reactor fleet continues to be decommissioned and only one major replacement project is underway. Energy Minister Amanda Solloway responded, “It is vital that we maintain our sovereign fuel manufacturing […]]]>

Fylde MP Mark Menzies asked the minister about accelerating plans to build new nuclear power plants to preserve skilled jobs.

It comes as the UK’s aging reactor fleet continues to be decommissioned and only one major replacement project is underway.

Energy Minister Amanda Solloway responded, “It is vital that we maintain our sovereign fuel manufacturing capability. The UK is a world leader in the nuclear fuel cycle, a testament to Springfields’ highly skilled workforce.

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Fylde MP Mark Menzies and staff at Westinghouse Springfields nuclear fuel fabrication plant in Salwick

“Maintaining this skilled workforce is essential to our Net Zero ambitions. “

The minister said she was aware of the short-term problems associated with the upcoming decline in demand for nuclear fuel nationally, but added that it would soon be an “exciting time” for the nuclear industry.

She added: “Nuclear power has an important role to play in decarbonizing our electricity production (…) and we will be proposing legislation in this Parliament to create more nuclear power in this country.”

She detailed the £ 385million funding to examine new small, modular and advanced reactors, and the additional £ 46million for an advanced fuel cycle project specifically at Springfields.

Springfield site

Ms Solloway added: “The government recognizes the importance of maintaining a strong skills base in the UK and we have worked with Westinghouse and the National Nuclear Laboratory to support this workforce.

“Further government support is being considered as part of the spending review and meetings will continue this month with Westinghouse.”

Mr. Menzies said: “I would like to thank the Minister for his very thoughtful response.

“There are many audiences today who listen to what is being said; investors looking to potentially invest in the UK will be delighted with what she said.

The workforce has heard a clear government commitment to secure a future for Springfields and to invest in the next generation of nuclear reactors to be powered in the UK.

Thanks for the reading. The Lancashire Post and Blackpool Gazette depend more than ever on your digital subscription to support our journalism. For unlimited access to local news, sports and online information, you can subscribe here for the Post Office and here for the Gazette


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Why Australia bet the house on enduring American power in Asia https://abwr.org/why-australia-bet-the-house-on-enduring-american-power-in-asia/ https://abwr.org/why-australia-bet-the-house-on-enduring-american-power-in-asia/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 17:19:56 +0000 https://abwr.org/why-australia-bet-the-house-on-enduring-american-power-in-asia/ Speaking on Thursday, Morrison said the enhanced security alliance with the United States and Britain, which will include collaborations on artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies, reflects the needs of a more dangerous dynamics in the Asia-Pacific region. “The relatively favorable environment that we have enjoyed for many decades in our region is behind us,” […]]]>

Speaking on Thursday, Morrison said the enhanced security alliance with the United States and Britain, which will include collaborations on artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies, reflects the needs of a more dangerous dynamics in the Asia-Pacific region.

“The relatively favorable environment that we have enjoyed for many decades in our region is behind us,” he said, without directly mentioning China. “We have entered a new era with new challenges for Australia and our partners.”

Some security analysts have argued that China’s recent retaliation against Australia over its harsher line – reducing imports of coal, wine, beef, lobster and barley, as well as holding in minus two Australian citizens of Chinese descent – seemed to have pushed Australia in the direction of the Americans. . In response, China could extend its campaign of economic sanctions. Australia seems to have calculated that Beijing has little interest in improving relations.

“I think the fear of doing this would have been much more palpable even three or four years ago, maybe even two years ago,” said Euan Graham, Asia-Pacific security analyst at the International Institute for Strategic Studies based in Singapore. . “But once your relationship is all about punishment and slurs, frankly, then that’s already taken into account. China doesn’t have the influence of fear, of being angry, because it is angry all the time. “

One looming question, according to critics of Australia’s steadfast faith in the United States, is whether Washington will measure up. Since President Barack Obama announced a “pivot to Asia” speaking to the Australian Parliament in 2011, US allies have awaited a decisive shift in resources and focus. For the most part, they were disappointed.

Dr Graham said the submarine deal would temper some of these criticisms. For other allies like Japan and South Korea, he said, “It answers that question that the United States is still engaging in its network of alliances in this part of the world.”


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Five UK companies chosen to demonstrate innovative technology to tackle radioactive waste https://abwr.org/five-uk-companies-chosen-to-demonstrate-innovative-technology-to-tackle-radioactive-waste/ https://abwr.org/five-uk-companies-chosen-to-demonstrate-innovative-technology-to-tackle-radioactive-waste/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 11:33:11 +0000 https://abwr.org/five-uk-companies-chosen-to-demonstrate-innovative-technology-to-tackle-radioactive-waste/ Five companies and their consortia have won contracts worth up to £ 900,000 each to build demonstrators of their ideas to tackle radioactive waste in the UK. Atkins, Barrnon, Cavendish Nuclear, Create Technologies and Veolia Nuclear Solutions (UK) will present their innovative techniques and technologies to meet the challenge of “radioactive waste”. They will work […]]]>

Five companies and their consortia have won contracts worth up to £ 900,000 each to build demonstrators of their ideas to tackle radioactive waste in the UK.

Atkins, Barrnon, Cavendish Nuclear, Create Technologies and Veolia Nuclear Solutions (UK) will present their innovative techniques and technologies to meet the challenge of “radioactive waste”.

They will work on a mixed pile of non-radioactive waste, with the aim of proving that they can increase recycling rates, reduce the number of waste containers sent for disposal and reduce risks to people and the environment.

The “Sort & Seg” innovation competition, launched in July 2020, challenged to find ways to sort and separate mixed radioactive waste at some of the UK’s oldest nuclear sites.

The first phase of the competition was organized in partnership with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), Magnox, Sellafield and Innovate UK.

Sara Huntingdon, Head of Innovation at NDA, said: “We are extremely impressed with the caliber of proposals received from the supply chain and I am delighted that we have been able to increase the number of companies that we are moving to. the next phase. .

“We had originally planned to fund three demonstrators, but since we received a wide range of ideas that could benefit our sites in the future, we are taking phase two further. We have increased the total value of the competition to £ 5.5million, which really demonstrates our continued commitment to research and development. This is good news for the supply chain and it gives us access to more innovative techniques and approaches that could help deliver the NDA’s mission safer, faster and in a way that costs less. expensive in the future.

If you liked this story, you can subscribe to our weekly email to Live Energy News – and if you want to know more about the journey to net zero by 2050, you can also sign up for the net zero future bulletin.


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Britain can’t count on France and Ireland to keep the lights on https://abwr.org/britain-cant-count-on-france-and-ireland-to-keep-the-lights-on/ https://abwr.org/britain-cant-count-on-france-and-ireland-to-keep-the-lights-on/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/britain-cant-count-on-france-and-ireland-to-keep-the-lights-on/ Organized? Reliable? It doesn’t look like it. In truth, add it all up and the electricity supply seems precarious. Anyone could be forgiven for deciding that it would be wise to have a few boxes of candles in the closet in case the lights go out and a really powerful battery somewhere in case that […]]]>

Organized? Reliable? It doesn’t look like it. In truth, add it all up and the electricity supply seems precarious. Anyone could be forgiven for deciding that it would be wise to have a few boxes of candles in the closet in case the lights go out and a really powerful battery somewhere in case that is the only way to go. recharge your phone.

It remains to be seen whether the UK falls into a major energy crisis. We can barely make our way, as we so often do. But we could be just a supply shock, or a long cold snap, away from real problems. Any country can handle a power shortage with progressive blackouts and a shortening of the week for factories and schools.

They are part of everyday life in many countries. But it’s not really a club you want to join (the top four countries for blackouts, in case anyone is wondering, are Bangladesh, Albania, Lebanon, and Congo). If it doesn’t get there quickly, the UK could end up on the list.

There are two big problems disrupting the market. First, unreliable weather conditions are hitting the renewable energy sector. Then the domestic market is in shambles, with many different suppliers, each of which could disappear at any time. So how do you fix it? Here are three places we could start.

First, the UK needs more relief supplies. Much of our electricity now comes from wind farms. That may be fine in the medium term, but while the capacity is being built, we need to make sure that there are plenty of alternative sources of supply, and that they can be activated with the flick of a switch. This might be news for ministers, but the weather is, uh, changing, and always will be. We cannot be left at his mercy. If that means we have too much capacity and we’re paying for factories that sit idle most of the time, so be it.


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Indonesian science super-agency must earn researchers’ trust https://abwr.org/indonesian-science-super-agency-must-earn-researchers-trust/ https://abwr.org/indonesian-science-super-agency-must-earn-researchers-trust/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 09:29:50 +0000 https://abwr.org/indonesian-science-super-agency-must-earn-researchers-trust/ Former President Megawati Soekarnoputri will chair the Indonesian scientific “super-agency”, BRIN.Credit: WF Sihardian / Pacific Press / LightRocket / Getty For decades, Indonesian leaders have observed that the country’s Southeast Asian neighbors have become powerhouses in technology and innovation. Indonesia lacks technological multinationals on the scale of Singapore, Thailand or Malaysia. Its companies only contribute […]]]>

Former President Megawati Soekarnoputri will chair the Indonesian scientific “super-agency”, BRIN.Credit: WF Sihardian / Pacific Press / LightRocket / Getty

For decades, Indonesian leaders have observed that the country’s Southeast Asian neighbors have become powerhouses in technology and innovation. Indonesia lacks technological multinationals on the scale of Singapore, Thailand or Malaysia. Its companies only contribute 8% of research and development (R&D) spending, and technology exports represent less than 10% of all exports. In contrast, Malaysian and Singaporean companies account for about half of all R&D spending, and technology accounts for half of exports.

Successive Indonesian governments have debated how the country can emulate its peers, and in 2017 Research Ministry Kemenristek proposed that researchers and companies work more closely. But for reasons still unclear, the government of President Joko Widodo has decided it is time to shake up the entire scientific system. The cabinet-level Ministry of Research was merged with the Ministry of Education, and a new “science super-agency”, BRIN, was inaugurated on April 28.

BRIN is headed by Laksana Tri Handoko, former director of the Indonesian Institute of Sciences, which was one of the country’s oldest national research organizations, employing some 2,000 researchers in mainly applied fields. Funding data has yet to be released, but BRIN’s budget is likely to be several multiples of the university budget.

This decision turned out to be unpopular with the Indonesian scientific community. Opposition to BRIN has brought together organizations from generation to generation, including the Indonesian Academy of Sciences and the Young Indonesian Academy of Sciences.

Last week, BRIN absorbed the science institute, along with other previously autonomous research organizations, including the National Nuclear Energy Agency and the Space and Aeronautics Agency. BRIN will eventually take responsibility for the R&D carried out in many, if not all, government departments. The agency will be overseen by a steering committee headed by Megawati Soekarnoputri, former president of Indonesia and chair of the Indonesian Democratic Party of the Power Struggle.

Handoko said Nature that changes are necessary to bring consistency to a fragmented research system. He says the grants will be awarded on the basis of independent peer review. In addition, the combination of many different sources of research and funding into one giant fund (including money from a corporate levy) will allow Indonesia to invest the large sums needed to build a new building. ‘research and technology infrastructure.

But researchers fear that such a structure could be a recipe for political interference in the funding of science. In addition, it is not yet clear how BRIN will drive innovation. Satryo Brodjonegoro, director of the Indonesian Academy of Sciences, said Nature that the creation of BRIN is a setback for Indonesian science.

Researchers are right to be concerned. Although the Indonesian government spends a small portion of its national income on R&D (in 2018 spending was only 0.23% of gross domestic product), over the past decade scientists in the country have recorded the rate Southeast Asia’s highest growth rate in scientific publications. This is in part because, since 2017, the country’s researchers have been evaluated based on their output in international journals.

Publications increased from 6,080 in 2013 to 37,513 in 2019, according to data compiled by the United Nations scientific agency, UNESCO (go.nature.com/3n4ky30). Of these, 24% are in physics and astronomy, and 27% in strategic fields such as artificial intelligence, energy, materials science and nanotechnology. Indonesia has also made significant gains in publishing related to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, and the proportion of researchers in the population has increased.

In the past, President Widodo has complained that researchers are not doing enough to spur innovation, but scientists fear that the country’s top leaders may not understand or respect their achievements.

It is rare for a country to bring previously autonomous R&D agencies under the control of a single body. An exception is the merger of nine UK funding agencies in 2018 with UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). Most of the countries in which R&D is more centrally organized, such as China, created this type of device at the outset. At the same time, some countries with relatively centralized systems, such as India and France, are on the path to decentralization by strengthening research and innovation in universities.

Other countries with a strong research tradition, such as Germany and the United States, divide the responsibility for scientific funding, governance and accountability among several organizations. Accountability is particularly important as it helps to ensure that the autonomy of staff and grant recipients is protected. And this is where Indonesia’s plans may come at the greatest risk. This urgently needs to be mitigated.

BRIN leaders should consult with the Indonesian science and innovation policy research community, where these issues have long been explored. At the very least, BRIN should consider giving the Indonesian parliament some sort of oversight role. Parliamentarians could, for example, approve its budget and check that promises of non-interference are kept. The UK has chosen not to report UKRI to Parliament; compared to previous provisions, this decision potentially increases the government’s influence on science funding.

A science agency chaired by one of Indonesia’s most powerful political figures, reporting directly to the president, has its advantages: science will be clearly represented at the highest level of government. But there may come a time – following a change of government, for example – when the leadership of BRIN and the Indonesian president come from different political parties. The agency will have to function just as well in such a scenario. This is why safeguards against interference and potential conflicts of interest must be put in place, and why parliament must play a more important role.

The creation of BRIN is, without a doubt, an ambitious reorganization, but it is not clear how the agency will help Indonesia in its technological ambitions. More clarity and better communication are needed, and the governance architecture must be designed to outlast its founders. Only then will Indonesian science and innovation truly flourish.


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Electric cars: Ofgem foresees an easier way for drivers to sell energy back to the grid | Ofgem https://abwr.org/electric-cars-ofgem-foresees-an-easier-way-for-drivers-to-sell-energy-back-to-the-grid-ofgem/ https://abwr.org/electric-cars-ofgem-foresees-an-easier-way-for-drivers-to-sell-energy-back-to-the-grid-ofgem/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 05:01:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/electric-cars-ofgem-foresees-an-easier-way-for-drivers-to-sell-energy-back-to-the-grid-ofgem/ Ofgem plans to make it easier for electric vehicle drivers to sell the energy stored in their cars’ batteries back to the power grid as part of an initiative to make the move away from fossil-fueled cars more affordable. Under the plan proposed by the UK energy regulator, electric vehicle drivers could earn money by […]]]>

Ofgem plans to make it easier for electric vehicle drivers to sell the energy stored in their cars’ batteries back to the power grid as part of an initiative to make the move away from fossil-fueled cars more affordable.

Under the plan proposed by the UK energy regulator, electric vehicle drivers could earn money by efficiently turning their cars into mobile power plants by releasing energy to the energy grid when demand hits the market. power grid peaked.

If enough drivers seize the opportunity to make money from their car batteries using vehicle-to-grid technology, the UK could avoid investing in new power plants with the equivalent generation capacity of up to to 10 large nuclear power plants.

It could help lower energy bills, even for UK households that don’t own an electric vehicle, according to Ofgem.

The number of electric vehicles on UK roads is expected to reach around 14 million by 2030, which will require billions of investments to modernize the electricity grid, but Ofgem hopes that by changing its grid rules it can unlock big savings for the energy system and consumer bills. . There were around 535,000 electric vehicles, including plug-in hybrids, on UK roads at the end of May 2021.

The British regulator plans to make it cheaper to connect charging stations to the electricity grid, which should allow more drivers to have access to charging stations where they need them.

Ofgem will also encourage the charging of ‘smart’ cars to make better use of electricity when demand is low and electricity is cheap before feeding the cheap energy back into the grid using vehicle-to-grid technology when demand. increases.

Neil Kenward, director of Ofgem, said the regulator would take a “three-pronged approach” by increasing the use of electric vehicles, the charging of “smart” cars and vehicle-to-grid technology “which together can help to cut costs for all UK bill payers ”.

He said: “Electric vehicles will revolutionize the way we use energy and provide consumers with new opportunities, through smart products, to enter the energy market to keep their costs as low as possible. . ”

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Graeme Cooper, head of future markets at National Grid, said Ofgem’s smart charging plan was “an important step” towards limiting the impact of the switch to electric vehicles on household bills.

“There will be an increase in energy demand, so we have to make sure that we are future-proof, placing the right wires in the right places for future demand,” he said.

“Smart charging essentially allows your car to ‘talk’ to the grid, using data to gauge the best time to charge your car,” Cooper added. “It’s a cheaper, more energy efficient and more sustainable way to charge electric vehicles. “


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Rolls-Royce bosses said Copeland was the place to be for the first small modular nuclear reactors https://abwr.org/rolls-royce-bosses-said-copeland-was-the-place-to-be-for-the-first-small-modular-nuclear-reactors/ https://abwr.org/rolls-royce-bosses-said-copeland-was-the-place-to-be-for-the-first-small-modular-nuclear-reactors/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 08:33:51 +0000 https://abwr.org/rolls-royce-bosses-said-copeland-was-the-place-to-be-for-the-first-small-modular-nuclear-reactors/ What two Rolls-Royce SMR plants could look like deployed on the same site Copeland MP Trudy Harrison and colleagues have made a compelling case for the Borough to be the location of the UK’s first Small Modular Reactors (SMRs). Yesterday Ms Harrison chaired a key officials meeting in Whitehaven where the shared vision and rationale […]]]>
What two Rolls-Royce SMR plants could look like deployed on the same site

Copeland MP Trudy Harrison and colleagues have made a compelling case for the Borough to be the location of the UK’s first Small Modular Reactors (SMRs).

Yesterday Ms Harrison chaired a key officials meeting in Whitehaven where the shared vision and rationale for hosting SMRs in Copeland was presented to officials from the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. (BEIS).

Managing Director Tom Samson and Directors Alan Woods and Alastair Evans of Proposed Reactor Developers Rolls-Royce SMR Ltd joined the MP; David Peattie and Martin Chown, CEOs of NDA and Sellafield Ltd respectively; and Pat Graham and Councilor David Moore, Chief Executive Officer and Deputy Mayor of Copeland City Council.

The meeting learned that Copeland has the local expertise and skills required to manufacture and operate the reactors, as well as a knowledgeable and supportive local council and community.

Led by Rolls-Royce SMR Ltd and with government support, the first phase of SMR development has been completed – including design and cost assessments – with the next stage of the regulator’s application for approval starting soon.

Ms Harrison said, “I am committed to ensuring a strong nuclear future at Copeland, and bringing SMRs to Copeland is the highest achievable priority for the nuclear industry.

“SMRs will provide clean, low-carbon and affordable energy and will play an important role in the government’s Net Zero ambitions for 2024.

“This community knows more about nuclear energy than anywhere else in Europe. We have a talent pool with experience in security and delivering projects of national significance, and I am pushing hard for Copeland to be at the forefront of this new and exciting approach to nuclear. “

The meeting took place on 65e anniversary of the day Calder Hall – the world’s first nuclear power plant – was connected to the grid.

Ms Harrison said: “I am proud to be the Member of Parliament representing the constituency where the world’s first civilian nuclear power plant was connected to the grid and the benefits the industry has brought to our workers and communities have been felt. since – and will be a long time in the future.


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Britain’s hydrogen strategy | Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP https://abwr.org/britains-hydrogen-strategy-pillsbury-winthrop-shaw-pittman-llp/ https://abwr.org/britains-hydrogen-strategy-pillsbury-winthrop-shaw-pittman-llp/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 16:41:41 +0000 https://abwr.org/britains-hydrogen-strategy-pillsbury-winthrop-shaw-pittman-llp/ The UK has pledged to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050. To achieve this goal, decarbonize UK ‘hard to electrify’ industrial sectors and provide flexible energy for heating, electricity and transport , the United Kingdom is focusing on the development of its hydrogen infrastructure. Hydrogen can also be used as energy storage to solve […]]]>

The UK has pledged to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050. To achieve this goal, decarbonize UK ‘hard to electrify’ industrial sectors and provide flexible energy for heating, electricity and transport , the United Kingdom is focusing on the development of its hydrogen infrastructure. Hydrogen can also be used as energy storage to solve intermittency issues associated with renewables such as wind and solar on the grid. The strategy supports the UK’s decarbonization goals by setting out a series of UK government commitments that define how the UK will deliver on its vision of a low carbon hydrogen economy.

The strategy foresees that the UK will rapidly and significantly increase hydrogen production and lay the groundwork for a low-carbon hydrogen economy by 2030, and details how the UK government will support innovation and stimulate investment in the sector. The strategy is focused on the short-term achievement of specific objectives: 5 GW of low-carbon hydrogen production capacity with potential for rapid expansion after 2030; and plans to see 1 GW of generation capacity by 2025. Not only is the focus on short-term goals, but the strategy also details how the UK will develop supply chains and skills needed to achieve these goals, as well as to create jobs and export opportunities for the UK. In addition, the strategy includes infrastructure plans to support the scale-up of the UK hydrogen grid and storage infrastructure needed for a UK hydrogen economy. The Hydrogen Strategy’s “whole system” approach is unique among the country hydrogen roadmaps announced so far and is specifically aimed at promoting foreign investment.

Development of a business model for hydrogen

The strategy proposes the development of a hydrogen business model (the hydrogen business model) and provides for a revenue mechanism to provide directed funding. The aim of the business model is to revive the industry by attracting investment from the private sector. A major barrier to the hydrogen economy is that the production and sale of hydrogen is currently more expensive than most high carbon alternative fuels. In the absence of government incentives, private investors may not choose to invest in low carbon hydrogen projects due to the uncertainty of obtaining a return on their investments. The hydrogen business model, which is still under development, will provide income support for hydrogen producers to close the initial cost gap between low-carbon hydrogen and higher-content fuels. in carbon, with the aim of enabling producers to price hydrogen competitively and encourage private sector investment in hydrogen. projects.

The preferred approach to close the price gap is a “variable premium” model where the hydrogen producer receives a premium for the hydrogen produced. The premium is calculated as the difference between an exercise price and a reference price (i.e. the market price) for each unit of hydrogen sold. This mechanism is similar to the “contract for difference” approach which has been successfully deployed for low-carbon electricity production assets. The exercise price covers the production cost foreseen by the producer and below this price, the difference between the market and production costs is constituted by the revenue regime. If the market price exceeds the strike price, the producer will have to reimburse the excess to the government.

The strategy also contains provisions for volume support to ensure that adequate capacity exists, whether or not there is demand. This could take the form of capacity payments or government contracts to purchase specified amounts of hydrogen, for example. After launching a consultation on the hydrogen business model at the same time as the publication of the strategy, responses to the consultation on the hydrogen business model are expected in early 2021 and must be published along with the terms. indicative of the hydrogen economic model. This process will allow the first contracts to be awarded from the first quarter of 2023.

The open question, however, is the source of funds for the business model payments. The short answer is that end consumers can ultimately foot the bill. The current plan is for hydrogen support to mirror support for renewable electricity. Revenue support for renewable electricity has been funded by passing costs indirectly on to consumers, for example costs related to supplier obligations that suppliers pass on to energy bills. The UK government’s plans assume that a similar approach would be taken for financing hydrogen production projects, but taking into account consumer affordability. Although income support is needed in the short term, the UK government expects its dependence to decrease as the hydrogen market matures.

The strategy also provides further details regarding the Net Zero Hydrogen Fund (NZHF) which will be launched in early 2022. The Fund will support the commercial deployment of new low carbon hydrogen production projects during the 2020s and will provide up to £ 240million in co-investments to support new production of low carbon hydrogen by 2025.

Measuring the carbon impact of hydrogen production

Because there are a variety of different ways to produce hydrogen, the carbon impact varies depending on the energy source used to produce it. Current production of hydrogen in the UK is derived almost entirely from fossil fuels, using the reformation of steam methane from natural gas without capturing or storing any of the resulting carbon emissions. To tackle these emissions, the Strategy takes a controversial two-track approach to support both the production of ‘green’ electrolytic hydrogen and the production of ‘blue’ hydrogen through carbon capture, alongside other pathways. potential production.1 While Chris Jackson, the former chairman of the UK Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Association, has resigned from his post due to this two-pronged approach, the UK government believes this two-pronged strategy will allow the sector to grow rapidly while reducing costs. . Notably, the strategy is technologically neutral and it includes blue hydrogen in its discussion alongside green hydrogen produced by nuclear power and renewables.

The controversy can be settled by including a clear definition of acceptable production methods for blue and green hydrogen. In order to measure the carbon impacts of various technologies, the Strategy proposes the development of a British standard on low carbon hydrogen. The proposal is essentially an emissions standard that defines what is meant by “low carbon” hydrogen. It will define a methodology for calculating greenhouse gas emissions associated with hydrogen production and a greenhouse gas emission threshold against which different low-carbon hydrogen production pathways would be measured. This will ensure that only low carbon hydrogen reaches the market. This has usually been coined a “colorless” approach.

Concrete and achievable objectives

The strategy defines a holistic approach to hydrogen that takes into account the entire value chain and provides for the specific expected results:

  • Progress towards ambition 2030: 5 GW of low-carbon hydrogen production capacity with potential for rapid expansion after 2030; hope to see a production capacity of 1 GW by 2025.
  • Decarbonising the UK’s existing hydrogen supply: Supply of existing hydrogen decarbonized by CCUS and / or supplemented by injection of electrolytic hydrogen.
  • Reduced cost of hydrogen production: A reduction in the cost of low-carbon hydrogen production thanks to lessons learned from first projects, more mature markets and technological innovation.
  • End-to-end hydrogen system with a wide range of users: End user demand is in place in a range of industries and locations across the UK, with many more end users able and willing to change.
  • Increased public awareness: The public and consumers know and accept the use of hydrogen throughout the energy system.
  • Promoting economic growth and opportunities in the UK, including jobs: UK-based capabilities and supply chain that translate into economic benefits, including through exports. The UK is an international leader and an attractive place for foreign investment.
  • Reduction of emissions within the framework of carbon budgets 4 and 5: Hydrogen makes an important contribution to the UK’s emission reduction targets, including putting the country on track to achieve CB6.
  • Preparing for the scale-up beyond 2030 – on the road to net zero: The infrastructure and technologies required for hydrogen are in place with potential for expansion. Well established regulatory and market framework in place.
  • Evidence-Based Policy Development: Modeling of hydrogen in the energy system and improved input hypotheses based on a larger literature, qualitative and quantitative evidence and real-world learning. Evidence of delivery of innovation and deployment projects collected and used to improve policy making.

Public consultation

The legislative process in the UK involves extensive interaction with stakeholders when developing government action plans. As a result, the Strategy was accompanied by separate requests for public comment through three separate “consultations” published alongside the Strategy. These consultations invite comments on a proposed hydrogen business model, a UK standard on low carbon hydrogen and the Net Zero Hydrogen Fund. The brief also included an appendix outlining the analysis and evidence underlying the hydrogen strategy and consultations.

Final thoughts

The strategy is comprehensive, thoughtful and provides strong evidence that the UK government is committed to tackling climate change. We look forward to seeing further progress and developments once the various public consultations are closed for comment. There are (inevitably) criticisms of the Strategy by some stakeholders, for example claiming that 5 GW of capacity is not ambitious enough or criticizing support for blue hydrogen as a necessary bridging technology to develop it. hydrogen economy in the UK. Nonetheless, we hope other governments will follow suit soon with their own comprehensive plans.

1 “Green” hydrogen is produced using low carbon energy sources and processes, while “blue” hydrogen is produced from high carbon intensive processes, but the resulting carbon is captured before they could escape into the atmosphere.


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The crop circles controversy in England – BBC Travel https://abwr.org/the-crop-circles-controversy-in-england-bbc-travel/ https://abwr.org/the-crop-circles-controversy-in-england-bbc-travel/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 23:18:44 +0000 https://abwr.org/the-crop-circles-controversy-in-england-bbc-travel/ Carson is more qualified than most to comment, having seen hundreds of crop circles appear in his fields – devastating thousands of pounds of crops in the process. It all started in 1990, when a famous formation known as the Eastfield Pictogram appeared overnight in one of Carson’s fields. It caught the attention of the […]]]>

Carson is more qualified than most to comment, having seen hundreds of crop circles appear in his fields – devastating thousands of pounds of crops in the process. It all started in 1990, when a famous formation known as the Eastfield Pictogram appeared overnight in one of Carson’s fields. It caught the attention of the world press, and a photograph of the crop circle was even used as a cover by Led Zeppelin. “Within days, thousands of people showed up,” Carson said. “We billed people a pound at a time, had key chains and t-shirts made. It was probably our highest grossing quarter acre ever.”

For some, this supports the theory that crop circles are nothing more than a lucrative business between hoaxes, farmers and photographers. The process was explained to me as follows by circle maker Dene Hine: “The circle makers do training; the drone pilot pilots the training; [they then use] social media platforms to spam all pages with videos. Each video can make £ 500 from YouTube alone. “

Social media is not just a market for the crop circles business. It’s a battleground for the toxic and parasitic relationship between croppies and hoaxes: Siamese twins who claim to hate each other but feed off each other for their existence. To the skeptical mind, after all, there would be no crop circles without hoaxes. Yet without the mystique and intrigue generated by the croppies, it’s hard to imagine the hoaxes would bother. However, beards are traded, and not just virtually; more than one croppie told me they had been physically threatened by hoaxes and photographers. “I’ve seen fights break out,” said Kathy Rossellini, an energy healer and psychic medium I met at the Crop Circle Exhibition & Information Center. “But I’m not getting involved in any of this. He was hijacked by the ego.”

There are a lot of things that remain cryptic about crop circles, even for farmers like Carson, who are fed up with it all and now deter visitors by cutting off all formations as soon as they appear. He spoke of watches stopping inside circles and inexplicably failing recording equipment during a visit to the BBC Newsround in 1991. He allowed companies like Nissan to build crop circles from behind. company in its fields for advertising purposes, but claims that a simple, basic design took professionals 12 hours of daylight to produce, contrary to the suggestion that hoaxes produce circles quickly in the dead of night.


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