Nuclear Energy USA – ABWR http://abwr.org/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 03:05:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abwr.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Nuclear Energy USA – ABWR http://abwr.org/ 32 32 Iran begins supplying gas to new centrifuges https://abwr.org/iran-begins-supplying-gas-to-new-centrifuges/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 19:13:22 +0000 https://abwr.org/iran-begins-supplying-gas-to-new-centrifuges/ Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi said an order had been issued to start supplying gas to hundreds of new centrifuges, including the IR1 and the More advanced IR6. “These centrifuges are advanced machines and this matter has already been brought to the agency’s attention,” Kamalvandi said. saidreferring to […]]]>

Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) spokesman Behrouz Kamalvandi said an order had been issued to start supplying gas to hundreds of new centrifuges, including the IR1 and the More advanced IR6.


“These centrifuges are advanced machines and this matter has already been brought to the agency’s attention,” Kamalvandi said. saidreferring to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).


He further said that this decision is in line with the implementation of the strategic action plan to lift sanctions and protect the interests of the Iranian nation, a piece of legislation adopted in 2020 by the Iranian parliament, and the objective of the country to reach a level of enrichment of 190,000 separate work units (UTS).


The spokesperson said parliament had previously forced the AEOI to start operating 1,000 IR6 centrifuges, among other measures. According to Kamalvandi, 500 IR6 centrifuges have been installed in nuclear facilities, while their launch process will take about 10-15 days. The remaining centrifuges are underway, he added.


Meanwhile, Iran and other signatories to the 2015 nuclear deal (JCPOA) are currently considering a new plan proposed by EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell to revive the deal in a near future.


Referring to the injection of gas into centrifuges, Iranian Foreign Minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian said on August 2 that Iran started injecting as an act of defiance following new US sanctions against entities trading in Iranian oil and petrochemicals.


He warned the United States not to try to pressure Iran with new sanctions, saying that “let them put aside their excessive demands. We adhere to logic and negotiation and are determined to reach a solid agreement. But if America wants to continue on its current path, we will never stand idly by.


Amir-Abdollahian described recent US sanctions against Iran as “ineffective” and “irrational” actions orchestrated by US President Joe Biden and Secretary of State Antony Blinken.


“The timing of these latest sanctions came as a surprise to Iran, as Tehran had in recent days received messages from the US President through mediators about the willingness of the United States to return to the nuclear deal. of 2015,” he said.


Meanwhile, AEOI chief Mohammad Eslami said on August 1 that “Iran has the technical capacity to build an atomic bombbut there is no such plan on the agenda.


In an interview with the Fars news site, Eslami also said that his organization cooperates constructively with the IAEA and that there are no disruptions in this cooperation.


“All our capabilities are carried out under the supervision of the agency based on the NPT treaty and the safeguards agreement,” he added, referring to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.


Iran removed the 27 IAEA cameras monitoring its facilities on June 9 following the resolution blame Iran for not answering questions about traces of uranium found at three undeclared sites.


IAEA chief Rafael Grossi said on July 22 that Iran’s nuclear program was “galloping aheadand that the agency had very limited visibility into what was going on.


On July 31, Iran’s chief negotiator Ali Bagheri Kani expressed Tehran’s willingness to conclude the talks on reviving the 2015 nuclear deal in a short period of time, saying Iran was working closely with the nuclear deal partners and the coordinator of the EU Enrique Mora, “to give America one more chance to demonstrate its goodwill and responsibility.”


According to Mohammad Eslami, work will begin in the coming weeks to build a research reactor at the Isfahan uranium conversion facility. He said on July 27 that the nuclear fuel production at the Isfahan plant was one of the AEOI programs that would allow Iran to join the ranks of clean fuel manufacturers in the world.


Referring to Iranian power plants, Eslami said one plant had already been built to produce 1,000 MW and another was under construction. According to him, it would produce 2,000 MW, the objective of the organization being to increase this figure to 10,000 MW.


Since April 2021, Iran and world powers have been engaged in negotiations in Vienna to revive the agreement which had collapsed after the US withdrawal in 2018. However, the talks have stalled since March 2022. In June 2022, Qatar hosted the indirect talks between Iran and the United States, but they ended without progress.

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Nuclear rebounds | FT power source https://abwr.org/nuclear-rebounds-ft-power-source/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 03:59:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/nuclear-rebounds-ft-power-source/ You can enable subtitles (captions) in video player After decades of decline, nuclear power is back in the limelight in the United States and around the world as governments seek to boost emissions-free power generation. Over the years, accidents at various power plants have fueled fear and mistrust about the safety of nuclear energy. But […]]]>

You can enable subtitles (captions) in video player

After decades of decline, nuclear power is back in the limelight in the United States and around the world as governments seek to boost emissions-free power generation. Over the years, accidents at various power plants have fueled fear and mistrust about the safety of nuclear energy. But even though it faces perception problems, another factor has proven to be a constant problem for the cost of nuclear. Recent construction projects in the US, UK and France have gone over time and over budget, scaring off investors.

The operation and maintenance of the reactors are also expensive. In the US, home to the world’s largest nuclear fleet, 13 reactors have been shut down since 2013. As it stands, analysts estimate that more than half of existing US reactors could be out of service by the end of the decade.

The reason for this is that plants whose operating costs were once considered revolutionary have struggled to compete on price with more efficient and modern gas and renewable energy generation. But the race to decarbonise and meet emissions targets has added new value to older reactors which, unlike wind and solar, can operate in all weathers. Indeed, despite the boom in renewables, nuclear power still provides around half of the country’s carbon-free electricity.

In a blow to President Biden’s fight against climate change, a landmark recent Supreme Court ruling limited the Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to limit greenhouse gas emissions from power plants , but Biden has said he won’t give up using his powers to tackle the climate crisis. . To help achieve his vision of a carbon-free grid by 2035, Biden has injected $6 billion to extend the life of existing reactors, but maintaining the existing fleet will not be enough, advocates say.

The industry hopes that a new generation of cheaper, safer, mass-produced reactors will take off in the coming years. Microsoft’s Bill Gates has become a key industry cheerleader. He argues that nuclear is ideal for fighting climate change as the only carbon-free and scalable source of energy available around the clock. He has injected millions of dollars into a start-up that plans to build a new type reactor, in an abandoned coal plant in Wyoming, and to launch a nuclear renaissance.

But there is still a long way to go. As policymakers and investors scramble to find the best solution to create carbon-free energy, nuclear finds itself competing with promising technological solutions ranging from carbon capture to hydrogen. Competition will be fierce as nuclear seeks to cement its position as a reliable energy source for the future.

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Ric Grenell to Newsmax: Germany can transform economy with return to nuclear power https://abwr.org/ric-grenell-to-newsmax-germany-can-transform-economy-with-return-to-nuclear-power/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 00:00:45 +0000 https://abwr.org/ric-grenell-to-newsmax-germany-can-transform-economy-with-return-to-nuclear-power/ The predicament of Germany, which is experiencing a severe oil drought and which is also indebted to Russia for natural gas production, could become a winter breaking point for 1st European economysaid Ric Grenell. However, there might be a way out of this conundrum, according to Grenell – the former US ambassador to Germany and […]]]>

The predicament of Germany, which is experiencing a severe oil drought and which is also indebted to Russia for natural gas production, could become a winter breaking point for 1st European economysaid Ric Grenell.

However, there might be a way out of this conundrum, according to Grenell – the former US ambassador to Germany and then former President Donald Trump’s acting director of national intelligence.

Assuming pride doesn’t get in the way.

“One thing they won’t do [right away]: Admit that Donald Trump was right, but they [Germany] should,” said Grenell newsmax Tuesday night, during an appearance on “The record with Greta Van Susteren.”

“[Trump] warned them that the strategy of restricting their energy, in terms of putting everything into Russian gas, was really a bad strategy. We knew it. The rest of Europe knew it. But for some reason, Chancellor [Angela] Merkel didn’t know that.”

Merkel stepped down as chancellor in December 2021. But Grenell says Germany is still paying for its mistakes.

As such, Grenell wondered aloud on Newsmax if “16 years of Merkelism” was ideal for Germany’s manufacturing-based economy?

“I would say this idea of ​​Germany getting out of nuclear power, restricting coal, is trying[ing] relying on wind and solar…is a really bad idea,” says Grenell. “They have to rethink their whole strategy. They have to bring back nuclear power.”

Earlier this week Russia’s Gazprom announced it would further reduce natural gas flows through a major pipeline to Europe to 20% of capacity, citing equipment repairs – a move that could have serious repercussions over Germany during the winter, as it prepares for major gasoline shortages and keeping homes warm (heating oil).

But Grenell reiterates that the new German leadership cannot rely on quick fixes that lead to problematic long-term consequences.

For starters, if Germany wants to continue to be seen as Europe’s largest and most flexible economy, it needs to subtly end its dependence on Russian oil and natural gas.

It’s much the same message Grenell delivered on Newsmax three years ago while serving in the Trump administration.

“What we oppose is an overreliance on Russia at a time when Russians have demonstrated that they really are bad actors,” Grenell said in 2019.

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NEWSMAX is America’s fastest growing cable news channel!

© 2022 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

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Is load shedding a symptom of Bangladesh’s energy insecurity? https://abwr.org/is-load-shedding-a-symptom-of-bangladeshs-energy-insecurity/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/is-load-shedding-a-symptom-of-bangladeshs-energy-insecurity/ A headline on July 7 in The star of the day announced, “Prime Minister plans to cut power generation to save fuel”. I regularly receive messages about recent episodes of load shedding, and not just from the poorer neighborhoods of Dhaka, but from other cities and towns across the country. Load shedding in Bangladesh has […]]]>

A headline on July 7 in The star of the day announced, “Prime Minister plans to cut power generation to save fuel”. I regularly receive messages about recent episodes of load shedding, and not just from the poorer neighborhoods of Dhaka, but from other cities and towns across the country. Load shedding in Bangladesh has now reached an alarming level. Rumors are circulating that the government may soon impose a work-from-home policy to save electricity. Fortunately, those privileged to live in apartment buildings with backup power generators feel less affected than the rest of the population, but one has to wonder how long this temporary respite will last.

Only a few months ago, our energy security appeared within reach and leaders were leaning towards a transition to a cleaner energy strategy. Last October, in a column in this newspaper, I extolled the success story of the electricity sector in Bangladesh (“How to fix the mess in the electricity sector?”, The star of the day, October 9, 2021). The country previously canceled 10 coal-fired power plant projects in July 2021 to reduce its future carbon footprint. There was constant talk of reducing the carbon footprint, and an official from the Department of Energy and Power announced, “There is a global concern about (the use of) coal and we need to buy into it. The government is committed to reducing carbon emissions. “

The tone has since changed. After Japan’s JICA canceled funding for Phase 2 of the Matarbari coal-fired power plant, the Prime Minister’s energy adviser asked at a recent conference in Dhaka: “When Europe returns to coal-fired power plants and invests millions of dollars, how can you [Japan] make the decision not to fund Matarbari?”

We had a power surplus a few months ago, and now the country faces the prospect of a “reduced power supply” until September, and possibly beyond. For example, the Prime Minister on July 5, 2022 said the government was considering “area-based load shedding” for a specific period to save fuel used for power generation. “Today, I think I will tell (the relevant authority) to reduce power generation for a certain period of time (every day) to save the fuel used for power generation,” he said. she declared.

So what happened, or as we say in Spanish “que pasa”? How have things changed so quickly that we have moved from an optimistic “zero carbon” scenario by 2050 to a grimmer picture with discussions of a traditional non-renewable and more carbon-intensive strategy? Well, the geopolitical outlook has changed and so much more. Inflation, the war in Ukraine, and skyrocketing oil and gas prices have simultaneously weighed on our clean energy transition plan.

Bangladesh, like all other countries, will now have to pay greater attention to its goal of energy security in light of the changing global economic and political reality and carefully balance the cost of a rapid transition to energy sources. cleaner energy. In a New York Times editorial, Mark Malloch-Brown, former UN Under-Secretary-General, writes that “South Africa’s energy transition plans indicate the scale of the challenge. Switching from coal to renewables like solar, wind and hydro will cost some $250 billion over the next three decades, about 3% of South Africa’s GDP”. Wealthier countries were once expected to fund developing countries’ technological transition programs, but now they are investing in armaments, new energy sources and their own war games.

Bangladesh is now rightly winding down previous plans to achieve ‘zero carbon’ by 2050. The Prime Minister’s energy adviser has vehemently denied that Bangladesh has made any promises of net zero carbon emissions. ‘Bangladesh is a very low carbon country and that’s why the promise of net zero emissions by 2050 will not apply to Bangladesh,’ said the Prime Minister’s energy adviser during a recent seminar on the Integrated Energy and Power Master Plan (IEPMP).

Looking ahead, Bangladesh needs to review its long-term energy strategy. Leaders need to reassess some of the misguided policies of the past. “Oil and gas remain at the heart of the world’s energy systems and are essential to energy security, at least in the short to medium term”, according to Professor Ernest J Moniz, former US Secretary of Energy and Professor Emeritus of Physics and Systems Engineering at MIT. “The slogan against the transitional role of fossil fuels has hindered progress on both climate change and energy security. Climate change and energy security must be a conversation to address both as effectively as possible,” Moniz adds. .

The government has signaled that it is now in favor of generating electricity from coal. Coal is making a comeback as energy needs increase, while the poorest countries struggle to obtain LNG supplies. The price of gas is expected to decrease over the coming year.

My research on the gas market leads me to believe that price volatility is likely to worsen. Natural gas prices have risen globally since the war in Ukraine and have risen from $4 per unit in 2020 to $41 today. “The gas crisis in Europe is drying up the LNG world,” said Valery Chow, head of Asia-Pacific gas and LNG research at Wood Mackenzie, an energy consultancy. “Emerging markets in Asia have paid the price and there is no end in sight.”

The dilemma for Bangladesh is multiple. Coal-fired power plants face the loss of credit while the tight LNG market depletes all energy from our foreign exchange reserves. The Minister of State for the Ministry of Power, Energy and Mineral Resources, however, expressed optimism that a short-term plan to extract an additional 618 million cft of gas from 46 wells in the country could bring results in three years.

“Nuclear energy is an important part of the future of clean energy. There are far fewer carbon emissions from solar energy. Along with this, new technologies will be our priority,” a- he added. Bangladesh could benefit from the funds the Biden administration is pouring into nuclear technology as well as renewable resources like solar and wind power.

As for the volatile oil market, prices could fall further in the coming months. The Paris-based International Energy Agency has lowered its oil demand forecast for this year and next. In a July 12 report by OPEC, global oil demand growth is expected to decline next year to 2.7 million barrels from 3.4 million barrels per day in 2022. This projection is based on the decline in projected GDP growth in Europe. economies and the United States due to soaring inflation and rising interest rates. China’s economic recovery is also expected to be slow, further easing pressure on oil markets.

Dr Abdullah Shibli is an economist and works for Change Healthcare, Inc., an information technology company. He is also a senior researcher at the US-based International Sustainable Development Institute (ISDI).

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TAE Technologies secures funds to build the next fusion machine: New Nuclear https://abwr.org/tae-technologies-secures-funds-to-build-the-next-fusion-machine-new-nuclear/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 15:08:14 +0000 https://abwr.org/tae-technologies-secures-funds-to-build-the-next-fusion-machine-new-nuclear/ July 20, 2022 Fusion energy company TAE Technologies has received investment to fund the construction of its sixth-generation research reactor which it says will demonstrate the net-energy viability of TAE’s approach. The announcement came as TAE’s fifth-generation Norman reactor maintained stable plasma at over 75 million degrees Celsius, 250% higher than its original target. A […]]]>

July 20, 2022

Fusion energy company TAE Technologies has received investment to fund the construction of its sixth-generation research reactor which it says will demonstrate the net-energy viability of TAE’s approach. The announcement came as TAE’s fifth-generation Norman reactor maintained stable plasma at over 75 million degrees Celsius, 250% higher than its original target.

A rendering of the Copernicus fusion reactor (Image: TAE Technologies)

TAE’s approach to fusion combines advanced accelerators and plasma physics, and uses abundant, non-radioactive hydrogen boron (p-B11) as a fuel source. Patented Magnetic Beam Driven Field Inverted Configuration (FRC) technology injects high energy hydrogen atoms into the plasma to make the system more stable and better contained. This solution is compact and energy efficient, according to TAE, based in California, USA.

Norman – TAE’s $150 million national lab-scale device named after the company’s founder, the late Norman Rostoker – was unveiled in May 2017 and reached first plasma in June of the same year. It was designed to keep the plasma stable at 30 million degrees Celsius. In April 2021, TAE announced that Norman had produced stable plasma at over 50 million degrees Celsius. The machine has now proven capable of maintaining stable plasma at over 75 million degrees Celsius, 250% higher than its original target.

TAE said the step builds confidence in its path to commercialization and helped the company raise $250 million in additional funding from investors in the energy, technology and engineering sectors. . Combined with previous rounds, TAE has now raised over $1.2 billion from investors.

Strategic and institutional investments, he said, will finance the construction of its sixth-generation research reactor. TAE’s Copernicus reactor, to be built in Irvine, California, will operate well above 100 million degrees Celsius to simulate the net energy production from the conventional Deuterium-Tritium (DT) fuel cycle. Copernicus will provide TAE with licensing opportunities for its DT fusion technology, while moving towards its ultimate goal using p-B11.

TAE said Chevron, Google, Reimagined Ventures, Sumitomo Corporation of Americas (SCOA) and TIFF Investment Management are among the company’s newest investors, along with “a large West Coast-based mutual fund manager.” United States and a large American pension fund”.

“The caliber and interest of our investors validates our significant technical progress and supports our goal to begin fusion commercialization by the end of this decade,” said Michl Binderbauer, CEO of TAE Technologies. “Global demand for electricity is growing exponentially and we have a moral obligation to do everything we can to develop a safe, carbon-free and economically viable baseload power solution.”

SCOA, the largest subsidiary of Tokyo-based Sumitomo Corporation, becomes TAE’s first Japanese investor and will become a partner in deploying commercial energy and other fusion-derived technologies in the Asia-Pacific market. SCOA has signed a business collaboration agreement to pursue TAE-based technologies in Japan and Asia.

“Through this investment in TAE, Sumitomo Corporation will deepen its understanding of fusion power generation technology with the goal of leveraging its experience and business network to apply this resource across multiple markets and industries, helping to the decarbonization of society,” the SCOA said.

“Through successful training of Norman’s state-of-the-art control system, combined with proprietary power management technology and extensive optimization of our machine learning algorithms, we have achieved control scale at a level of unprecedented built-in complexity,” Binderbauer said. “Our long-standing expertise in fusion, along with major advances in design and operational proficiency, are paying off as we move towards delivering an inexhaustible source of clean energy that has the capacity to transform the human experience and support future generations.”

Research and writing by World Nuclear News



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US NRC Releases EIA for Holtec Interim Storage Facility https://abwr.org/us-nrc-releases-eia-for-holtec-interim-storage-facility/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 17:56:12 +0000 https://abwr.org/us-nrc-releases-eia-for-holtec-interim-storage-facility/ US-based Holtec International announced that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued the final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for its HI-STORE Consolidated Intermediate Storage Facility (CISF) project. ) for used nuclear fuel in southeastern New Mexico. The final 736-page EIS includes NRC staff’s recommendation that there are no environmental impacts that would preclude NRC […]]]>

US-based Holtec International announced that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued the final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for its HI-STORE Consolidated Intermediate Storage Facility (CISF) project. ) for used nuclear fuel in southeastern New Mexico.

The final 736-page EIS includes NRC staff’s recommendation that there are no environmental impacts that would preclude NRC from issuing a permit for environmental reasons. The recommendation is based on a review of Holtec’s license application; consultation with federal, state, tribal and local agencies; input from other stakeholders; independent consultation with the New Mexico Bureau of Land Management; and NRC’s own environmental review. NRC’s review covered land use, transportation, geology and soils, surface and ground water, ecological resources such as threatened and endangered species, noise, historic resources and cultural, public and occupational health, environmental justice, socio-economics and other considerations.

The final EIA also confirms that there are no negative impacts on other businesses in the area, including oil and gas, livestock and agriculture. Designed with safety and environmental stewardship as primary considerations, the fully welded and hermetically sealed containers that will be safely stored at the facility are designed, qualified and tested to maintain their integrity and prevent the release of radioactive material into worst case accident scenarios. postulated by NRC regulations for storage and transportation.

Holtec International and its partner, the Eddy-Lea Energy Alliance (ELEA) of New Mexico, launched the initiative to establish the self-contained CISF in southeastern New Mexico on a parcel of land owned by ELEA in 2015. ELEA selected Holtec and its underground HI-STORM UMAX fuel storage system after determining it was the safest technology for their community. Holtec claims that the HI-STORM UMAX underground storage system “provides an unconditionally safe and secure, non-permanent, easily retrievable, and centralized facility for the interim storage of the nation’s spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste until a permanent solution is available”.

“We believe that the aggregation of spent fuel from 75 sites scattered across the country is both a national security imperative and an essential predicate for the rise of resurgent nuclear power to meet energy goals. our nation’s own,” said Holtec CEO Dr. Kris Singh.

The initial request for the HI-STORE CISF includes storage of up to 8,680 metric tons of uranium in commercial spent nuclear fuel (500 rounds) with future modifications for up to 10,000 storage rounds. The United States currently has more than 80,000 metric tons of used nuclear fuel in stock, and the stockpiles are growing by 2,000 metric tons a year. HI-STORE CISF is authorized to use Holtec’s own funds with the support of Southeast New Mexico communities incorporated as ELEA.

The HI-STORM UMAX system is already in use at two sites in the United States. It stores stainless steel containers containing spent fuel or high-level waste entirely below ground, establishing a “safety-friendly” storage facility, providing a clear and unobstructed view of the entire CISF from any location. what place. The HI-STORM UMAX is physically sized to store all cartridges currently licensed for used nuclear fuel storage in the United States and all types of nuclear fuel currently in use. John Heaton, Vice President of ELEA, said the project will “diversify our economy, generate 350 jobs and potentially represent a $3 billion investment in our region”.

The NRC said Holtec initially proposes to store 500 containers containing approximately 8,680 metric tons of spent fuel in a first phase and eventually to store up to 10,000 containers in 19 additional phases. The containers would be transported by rail from operating, decommissioned and decommissioned U.S. commercial nuclear power plants.

The NRC released a draft EIS for public comment in March 2020 and the public comment period was extended to six months due to the COVID pandemic. During this period, NRC staff held six online public meetings to present the draft EIS and receive public comments.

Over 4,800 comment submissions with 3,718 individual comments were received and addressed in the final EIS.

“Publishing the final EIA completes the environmental portion of the NRC’s licensing review,” the NRC said. “Staff will make a clearance decision following the completion of their security assessment report, due in January 2023.


Image: Vision of the proposed HI-STORE consolidated interim storage facility for used nuclear fuel showing how the drums would be stored underground (photo courtesy of Holtec)

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Fed up with net zero climate targets, activists call for ‘true zero’ https://abwr.org/fed-up-with-net-zero-climate-targets-activists-call-for-true-zero/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 12:34:46 +0000 https://abwr.org/fed-up-with-net-zero-climate-targets-activists-call-for-true-zero/ As United Nations concern over climate change has intensified in recent years, a slew of companies have announced net-zero carbon emissions targets. More … than 300 large companiesincluding Amazon, Procter & Gamble, HP and Salesforce, have now signed a pledge to achieve net zero emissions by 2040. Countries’ net zero pledges cover around 70% of […]]]>

As United Nations concern over climate change has intensified in recent years, a slew of companies have announced net-zero carbon emissions targets.

More … than 300 large companiesincluding Amazon, Procter & Gamble, HP and Salesforce, have now signed a pledge to achieve net zero emissions by 2040. Countries’ net zero pledges cover around 70% of global gross domestic product and carbon emissions, the International Agency said. Energy. in a report last May.

But net zero – which calls for a neutral carbon impact through removing the same amount of emissions from the atmosphere as an entity releases – has drawn backlash from campaigners and some experts. The approach allows companies to continue releasing significant amounts of carbon while pursuing emissions offsets, which are difficult to verify and sometimes rely on technology that has yet to be developed, advocates for the policy have said. environment at ABC News.

Many advocates have called on companies to instead pursue a “true zero” emissions goal, which calls for the outright elimination of carbon emissions. The more ambitious goal would ensure companies significantly reduce carbon emissions and remove the challenge of developing and verifying carbon offsets, advocates told ABC News.

But the paradigm shift towards true zero emissions goals is still in its infancy and could lead to economic disruption, radically altering or eliminating industries that depend on fossil fuels, such as oil and gas, the ministers said. supporters.

Katie Tubb, a researcher on energy and environmental issues at the conservative think tank Heritage Foundation, took those concerns further, saying a transition to true zero would be unachievable for many businesses, provide only a fraction of the reductions in carbon emissions needed globally and would potentially increase costs for businesses and consumers.

Advocates, however, said the urgent need to cut carbon emissions requires an ambitious approach like true zero.

“Companies are using the net zero mantra like a fig leaf to continue what they’re doing,” David Klein, a math professor at California State University Northridge, where he helps with the Climate Science Program, told ABC News.

“Think of it as a pan of water heated by a flame below,” he added. “As long as this flame is lit, as long as energy is entering the system, the temperature will continue to rise. Instead of net zero, we need to decrease the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by drastically decreasing the emissions.”

Members of the public and delegates cheer after the adoption of a historic pact on global warming during the COP21 climate conference in Le Bourget, north of Paris, December 12, 2015.

Francois Guillot/AFP via Getty Images, FILE

A UN climate report published in April sounded an urgent alarm that the world is on the verge of far exceeding a 1.5 degree Celsius rise above pre-industrial temperatures – a level beyond which many scientists say climate change will have negative effects. During the Paris climate agreements in 2015, 196 parties committed to setting a goal well below 2 degrees Celsius warming, preferably below 1.5 degrees Celsius warming.

“It’s now or never if we want to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius,” said Jim Skea, professor of sustainable energy at Imperial College London. in a report the release of the April UN climate report. “Without immediate and deep emission reductions across all sectors, this will be impossible.”

The UN, who said so supports an eventual net zero economy in the world, recognized the importance of verifying net zero commitments. The The UN indicates on its website that net zero commitments “must be backed by credible action”. In March, UN Secretary General António Guterres established a group of experts that will recommend standards for net zero emissions pledges.

But measuring an entity’s achievement of a net zero goal poses a significant, potentially insurmountable challenge that hurts the global effort to reduce carbon emissions, said Tyson Slocum, director of the group’s energy program. consumer advocacy Public Citizen.

“The ability to effectively oversee and verify these programs is very difficult,” he said, noting the challenge of estimating not only a company’s emissions, but also the carbon savings generated by its offsets. “Even if we had better protocols, there are concerns about how effectively it will work.”

“Much of the push around net zero and its reliance on offsets is actually a distraction from meaningful action to address the climate crisis,” he added.

The rapid development of renewable energy sources has equipped the industry with the resources to embark on the real zero crossing, environmental advocates said. Last year, renewable energy sources accounted for about 12.2% of total US energy consumption and about 20.1% of electricity generation. IEA said. Worldwide, the share of renewable energies in electricity production was 29% in 2020, the the group said.

Yet few companies have embraced the goal of true zero. One of these companies, NextEra Energy, is a holding company that oversees Florida Power & Light, a utility company that serves more than 12 million people in the state and aims to achieve zero emissions by 2045.

The company believes it can maintain the reliability and competitive price of its electricity while eliminating emissions, said Chris McGrath, communications manager at Florida Power. & Light, told ABC News.

PICTURED: United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres addresses the 43rd Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Heads of Government Meeting, at Assuria High Rise in Paramaribo, Suriname, July 3, 2022.

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres addresses the 43rd Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Heads of Government Meeting, at Assuria High Rise in Paramaribo, Suriname, July 3, 2022.

Ranu Abhelakh/AFP via Getty Images

“True zero for us is not a goal that relies on offsets,” McGrath said. “We are pursuing true zero because we believe it is achievable. We believe the technology exists now that we will be able to eliminate emissions and keep the lights on 24/7.”

The company plans to get to true zero by increasing the share of power it gets from solar power, improving battery storage that retains solar power during dark periods at night or when it’s cloudy fact, continuing its nuclear power operations and developing green hydrogen technology, McGrath said.

Green hydrogen technology would use renewable energy to power a process that extracts hydrogen from water, allowing the hydrogen to be used for tasks such as propelling vehicles or generating electricity . But the technology has yet to be developed, leaving Florida Power’s real zero goal & Light open to criticism that it relies on technology that currently doesn’t exist, much like some net zero lenses.

In response, McGrath said the technology does not represent a major leap in development.

“Hydrogen combustion is not a new technology,” McGrath said. “What’s unique for us is using solar energy to power the process.”

“We’re not claiming there won’t be challenges associated with achieving this goal, but we’ve been following this path for more than two decades,” he added.

Environmental advocates said rapid advances in renewable energy technology have helped meet zero-carbon goals, but acknowledged the change would disrupt the economy and have a huge impact on industries that depend on fossil fuels.

“There are certain industries, like an airline or a big oil company, where it’s going to be a bit difficult,” said Slocum, energy program director at Public Citizen. “They can’t really hit true zero effectively.”

The availability and affordability of renewable energy will ease the transition for many businesses, he added.

“There are all kinds of readily available, usable, and affordable technologies that businesses and other entities can incorporate into their systems,” he said.

Tubb, a researcher on energy and environmental issues at the conservative Heritage Foundation think tank, dismissed such an optimistic view. True zero emissions reductions from the select group of U.S. companies that could access large-scale renewables in the near term would only be a fraction of the emissions reductions needed around the world, she said. declared. In addition, the significant change in operations will impose costs on businesses and consumers, she added.

“That’s a lot of expense for a company to take on with questionable environmental benefits on the global warming side,” she said.

Rolf Skar, campaign manager for environmental advocacy group Greenpeace USA, said the call for a large-scale commitment to real zero is realistic rather than drastic, given the current pace of carbon emissions and the threat posed by climate change.

“If it’s radical, it’s radical because of the necessity of the crisis we’re in right now,” he said.

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America’s Energy Independence https://abwr.org/americas-energy-independence/ Tue, 12 Jul 2022 18:02:38 +0000 https://abwr.org/americas-energy-independence/ Comment The United States is a large country with enormous natural resources, but our energy independence is complicated. For example, with oil, it was a completely different story 140 years ago. Official figures vary, but in 1880 the United States was responsible for 85-95% of the world’s oil production and refining. John D. Rockefeller was […]]]>

Comment

The United States is a large country with enormous natural resources, but our energy independence is complicated.

For example, with oil, it was a completely different story 140 years ago. Official figures vary, but in 1880 the United States was responsible for 85-95% of the world’s oil production and refining. John D. Rockefeller was the undisputed king of oil, and at that time the New York World called his company, Standard Oil, “the most cruel, impudent, ruthless, and greedy monopoly that ever entered a country.” Standard Oil’s hold on oil lasted until 1906, when the U.S. government sued to break up the company citing the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890.

In 1914, the United States imported oil from Mexico due to World War I shortages; then between 1943 and 1950 the United States became a net importer of oil. This was largely due to the pressure placed on energy products by the two world wars and the growing automotive industry.

Fast forward to 1960 and the United States finds itself in competition with the new OPEC, which at the time accounted for around 80% of world crude exports.

However, since 2018, the United States has regained its energy dominance, largely thanks to fracking. In 2020, America became the largest exporter of refined petroleum products (although it still imported crude oil). Either way, the past 100+ years has been quite a ride for oil, gas and natural gas.

An article published this year in The Atlantic states: “As of 2018, the United States has been the world’s largest producer of oil and natural gas. On paper, “we are energy independent,” Hess CEO John Hess said yesterday at CERAWeek, the energy industry’s annual conference. But what a strange independence it is. As he spoke, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine pushed US gas prices over $4.10 a gallon, setting a new all-time high. Energy independence has neither insulated the economy from geopolitics nor provided the United States with more industrial capacity in times of emergency.

Oil, gas and natural gas are all well and good, but what about the future of energy? What about the future of energy in the United States?

Renewables, such as wind and solar, recently hit an all-time high of 28%. According to USA Today, “the percentage of US electricity produced by renewable energy from wind, solar and hydroelectric dams has steadily increased, from 8.6% in April 2001 to 28% in April.” However, for renewables – oil, gas and nuclear aside – much of the future of energy relies on lithium-ion batteries.

To quote Simon Moores, CEO of Benchmark Mineral Intelligence, “The energy revolution is here and it’s called the lithium-ion battery. Used in everything from medical devices, cell phones, laptops, electric vehicles and power tools; the majority of the supply is done abroad.“

Simon is right, we are in a new economy with new energy needs and it’s not just smartphones and computers. Recently, Chinese automaker BYD, which makes electric and hybrid vehicles, recently overtook Tesla in electric vehicle sales. Additionally, Stellantis, the global automaker of Jeep, Maserati and Chrysler, has invested in an Australian lithium mine Vulcan energy resources. Stellantis paid $76 million for an 8% stake in Vulcan.

The United States is the world’s largest oil producer, the world’s largest natural gas producer, and the world’s third largest coal producer. At this stage, the United States can either maintain its energy status quo, which involves a mix of oil and energy imports to produce domestic energy products (refining, natural gas, etc.); or it can focus on developing a robust energy security program while developing valuable energy sources and international partnerships.

But that won’t help us with the raw materials to make lithium-ion batteries.

As I said earlier this year, “China controls 80% of all battery cell manufacturing capacity and with capacity only set to increase – in fact, it’s set to double to over two terawatt hours – China will have enough capacity for more than 20 million electric vehicles (EVs) within five years.

It is clear that the United States needs a strong energy policy for the future, one in which the United States emerges as a national and international leader in research and development on fossil fuels, renewables, batteries and energy.

For the next few decades, the supply of raw materials for lithium-ion batteries is king. America had better get ahead of the game or lose the race, or we risk being sucked into another energy-saving fiasco.

The opinions expressed in this article are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of The Epoch Times.

Chadwick Hagan

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Chadwick Hagan is a financier, entrepreneur, author and columnist. He has managed businesses and investments in global markets for two decades. As an author and writer, he covers economics, fine arts and conservation. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and is based in Atlanta and London.

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Lessons for South Africa from the global energy crisis https://abwr.org/lessons-for-south-africa-from-the-global-energy-crisis/ Fri, 08 Jul 2022 12:56:06 +0000 https://abwr.org/lessons-for-south-africa-from-the-global-energy-crisis/ by Gaopalelwe Santswere and Knox Msebenzi The current geopolitical conflict in Eastern Europe has caused energy costs to rise sharply in Western Europe as fossil fuel supply lines are cut. China, India, the United States, East Asia and some countries in the European Union are now mining and burning more coal to make up for […]]]>

by Gaopalelwe Santswere and Knox Msebenzi

The current geopolitical conflict in Eastern Europe has caused energy costs to rise sharply in Western Europe as fossil fuel supply lines are cut. China, India, the United States, East Asia and some countries in the European Union are now mining and burning more coal to make up for the shortage of natural gas.

South Africa currently depends on coal for electricity generation, with coal accounting for 69% of electricity generation in 2016. In terms of coal reserves, the country has the ninth largest deposit in the world. South Africa’s coal production accounts for almost 90% of electricity production and 77% of primary energy needs. This translates to 243,412 gigawatt hours (GWh) generated from coal and peat.

However, this has had a negative environmental impact, making South Africa one of the world’s largest emitters of CO2 and being responsible for over 90% of Africa’s total CO2 emissions.

The rising cost of fossil fuels alone is having a catastrophic impact on global economies. The global impact of these factors is already being felt. According to data provided by Eskom in April, the company burned 48.5 million liters of diesel for R626 million, operating open cycle gas turbine power plants to meet peak electricity demand this month. -the.

This volume of diesel is enough to fill the tanks of 1,077,777 Volkswagen Polo or 606,250 Toyota Hilux bakkies. Based on these amounts, Eskom paid around R12.91 per liter of diesel. Current diesel prices in South Africa have already reached R23 per litre.

Interest for you:
Coal still dominates South Africa’s energy mix, says CSIR report

World history shows that renewables have done very little to diversify Europe’s overreliance on fossil fuels. Germany currently depends on Russia for gas to back up its renewables and is among the EU members with the most renewable energy capacity despite not having produced a single watt of solar power. since the start of 2022. As South Africa has no gas as a source of domestic resource, this means that it would have to rely on Mozambique or global markets, which as the situation has shown, is incredibly risky.

Since last week, South Africans have been subjected to devastating Level 6 load shedding (or more, if the truth is to be believed, with power outages of up to 8 hours a day). This continuous interruption of electricity constantly poses a serious threat to the South African economy.

Several power plants failed and contributed to the blackout. Some were offline due to planned maintenance, but the southern African country is suffering a loss of generation capacity of 16,307 MW due to outages. It has been estimated that in 2020, load shedding cost the South African economy R500 million per stage per day.

Did you read?
Op-ed: Who said nuclear power plants were inherently dangerous?

anti-nuclear lobby

Mainstream climate activists joined anti-nuclear lobbyists who lumped fossil fuels together with nuclear as bad for the environment. Despite the empirical/statistical evidence that shows that per kWh produced, nuclear is one of the safest energy sources the world has ever known. Nuclear power plants do not emit GHGs during their operation.

The main argument of the argument against is the issue of nuclear waste which lasts for thousands of years. A long debate ensued with major stakeholders with diametrically opposed opinions on whether nuclear should be classified as green. In February 2022, the European Commission declared nuclear and gas to be green, a decision which met with strong opposition from some members such as Germany and Austria, but was supported by France and France. ‘others.

In addition to the alarmist campaign against nuclear, another angle of attack was the costs associated with nuclear. While it is true that the construction costs of nuclear power plants are much higher than alternative energy sources, their lifespan is much longer and therefore the levelized cost of electricity is very low. Nuclear power plants are generally licensed for 40 years of operation and are subject to life extension thereafter to 80 years. Equipment subject to wear is replaced or refurbished.

Coupled with these upfront costs are the long lead times for large-scale factories. This challenge is being addressed by the introduction of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) which are seen as the “plug and play” answer in the nuclear industry. This dramatically reduces turnaround times as most of the construction is done in factories, increasing quality control systems. These were compared to airline planes built by Boeing or Airbus and put into service around the world. They can work for long periods of 10 to 15 years without a break. Once this period is over, SMR requires upgrading and recharging, and another nuclear power plant can be easily moved in its place.

Did you read?
What you need to know about SMRs

Rebirth of nuclear energy

The global energy crisis is a wake-up call for many countries that were hesitant to include nuclear as an important part of their energy mix. The United Kingdom and France have announced major nuclear expansion. The Indians, Russians and Chinese were already big on nuclear. Other countries that were considering phasing out nuclear power, such as South Korea and Belgium, have reversed their decision.

Many African and other developing countries have big plans to take care of their energy with the introduction and development of nuclear power generation. The Egyptian Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (ENRRA) has issued a construction permit to the National Nuclear Power Plants Authority for Unit 1 of the planned four-unit nuclear power plant at El Dabaa. This will put Egypt in an advantageous position with regard to the stature of the IAEA and also the position occupied in the United Nations Security Council, with South Africa becoming the second on the continent behind Egypt in terms of presence. geopolitics. ESI

About the authors:

Gaopalelwe Santswere is the vice president of Nuclear Industry Association of South Africa (NIASA) and Knox Msebenzi is the Director General of NIASA.

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US produces more wind, solar than nuclear for first time https://abwr.org/us-produces-more-wind-solar-than-nuclear-for-first-time/ Fri, 08 Jul 2022 10:44:33 +0000 https://abwr.org/us-produces-more-wind-solar-than-nuclear-for-first-time/ In April this year, sustainable wind and solar power sources produced 17.96 percent more electricity than nuclear power plants, the first time the former exceeded the latter in US history. This increase in wind and solar electricity means that clean energy, which also includes geothermal, hydroelectric and biomass energy, accounts for nearly 30% of total […]]]>

In April this year, sustainable wind and solar power sources produced 17.96 percent more electricity than nuclear power plants, the first time the former exceeded the latter in US history.

This increase in wind and solar electricity means that clean energy, which also includes geothermal, hydroelectric and biomass energy, accounts for nearly 30% of total electricity in the United States, according to data from the ‘US Energy Information Administration (EIA). In 2021, clean energy accounted for only about 20 percent of total electricity across the country.

“Despite headwinds such as the COVID pandemic, grid access issues and disruptions to global supply chains, solar and wind remain on track,” said Ken Bossong, executive director of SUN DAY Campaign, which analyzed the EIA data, in a press release. .

“Furthermore, by outperforming nuclear power by ever-greater margins, they illustrate the folly of trying to revive the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in California and the just-retired Palisades reactor in Michigan rather than focusing on energy. accelerating the growth of renewable energy.”

Image of a wind and solar farm. In April, wind and solar generated more electricity than nuclear for the first time in the United States
iStock/Getty Images Plus

The burning of coal and other fossil fuels like oil and gas has been established as the determinant in climate change, with coal alone responsible for 0.3C of the 1°C increase in global temperature so far. Fossil fuels contain hydrocarbons which, when burned, release energy that we convert into electricity to power our homes and businesses. However, fossil fuels release carbon dioxide as a byproduct of this combustion process, which traps heat inside the atmosphere. The consequences of climate change resulting from these rising temperatures are dire, ranging from rising sea levels to increased droughts and severe weather events, biodiversity loss and crop failure.

While nuclear power is a way to generate electricity without producing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, the nuclear waste produced by power plants is incredibly dangerous. They also have the potential to malfunction catastrophically: The 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster in the Soviet Union sent local cancer rates skyrocketing, despite numerous radiation deaths among workers and firefighters.

Renewable energy sources seem to be the best solution to the pervasive results of climate change. Not only do they produce less greenhouse gas emissions than fossil fuels, but they are also sustainable because we can’t use all the wind like we can with underground coal and oil. Wind, solar and hydroelectric energy are the three biggest renewable energy providers globally, and thanks to the falling costs of their use over the last decade (85% reduction in solar energy costs and 55% reduction in wind energy costs), they are gaining popularity all over the world.

While coal still makes up the majority of electricity generation in the United States, the amount the country relies on it is declining, having fallen about 4% in 2021.

According to the International Energy Agency, in order to reach net zero by the 2050 goal of the Paris Agreement, the world’s wind and solar energy needs represent 20% of the total electricity of by 2025 and 70% by 2050.

COO of the Global Energy Think Tank emberPhil MacDonald said in a statement:

“Wind and solar are breaking records around the world. The process that will reshape the existing energy system has begun. Wind and solar provide a solution to the ‘trilemma’ of achieving a sustainable, affordable energy supply and safe. This decade, they must be deployed with lightning speed.”

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