Nuclear Energy USA – ABWR http://abwr.org/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 15:52:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://abwr.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Nuclear Energy USA – ABWR http://abwr.org/ 32 32 No plans for a meeting between the United States and Iran at the UN next week, according to the American envoy https://abwr.org/no-plans-for-a-meeting-between-the-united-states-and-iran-at-the-un-next-week-according-to-the-american-envoy/ https://abwr.org/no-plans-for-a-meeting-between-the-united-states-and-iran-at-the-un-next-week-according-to-the-american-envoy/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 10:08:18 +0000 https://abwr.org/no-plans-for-a-meeting-between-the-united-states-and-iran-at-the-un-next-week-according-to-the-american-envoy/ UNITEDNATIONS – US Secretary of State Antony Blinken has no plans to meet his new Iranian counterpart next week at the annual gathering of world leaders at the United Nations in New York, US Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield said on Friday . Indirect talks between Iran and the United States in Vienna on relaunching a 2015 […]]]>

UNITEDNATIONS – US Secretary of State Antony Blinken has no plans to meet his new Iranian counterpart next week at the annual gathering of world leaders at the United Nations in New York, US Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield said on Friday .

Indirect talks between Iran and the United States in Vienna on relaunching a 2015 deal, aimed at limiting Iran’s ability to develop a nuclear weapon, ended in June. Tehran has said its nuclear program is for peaceful energy purposes only.

The hard-line Iranian president Ebrahim Raisi took office in August and his foreign minister Hossein Amirabdollahian is due to travel to New York for the United Nations General Assembly.

“We have engaged with the Iranians and in Vienna, and these discussions will continue,” Thomas-Greenfield told reporters.

“We haven’t made any direct plans for bilateral meetings while they’re here, but that doesn’t mean we don’t see the point in having talks with the Iranians because we want to go from there. ‘forward on issues related to JCPOA,” she said.

The nuclear deal between Iran, the United States, France, Britain, Germany, Russia and China is called the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). Under the deal, Iran agreed to restrictions on its nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of numerous foreign sanctions against it.

However, former US President Donald Trump abandoned the pact in 2018 and reimposed tough sanctions, prompting Tehran to start violating some of the nuclear limits in 2019.


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Courage is not fearless, it is about what is right | News, Sports, Jobs https://abwr.org/courage-is-not-fearless-it-is-about-what-is-right-news-sports-jobs/ https://abwr.org/courage-is-not-fearless-it-is-about-what-is-right-news-sports-jobs/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 04:29:14 +0000 https://abwr.org/courage-is-not-fearless-it-is-about-what-is-right-news-sports-jobs/ We have just celebrated the 20th anniversary of the September 11 attacks. Most people old enough to remember the time remember it very well. At the time, I was a business manager meeting with a client in Buchanan, Virginia. Joe, a tall burley, barged into the meeting and told us that a plane had just […]]]>

We have just celebrated the 20th anniversary of the September 11 attacks. Most people old enough to remember the time remember it very well.

At the time, I was a business manager meeting with a client in Buchanan, Virginia. Joe, a tall burley, barged into the meeting and told us that a plane had just crashed into one of New York’s Twin Towers. When he barged in and said the second tower had been hit, we all knew something was up. Then we heard about the Pentagon attack and Flight 93 in Shanksville, PA. I feared for the safety of my children in Maryland, Virginia and my oldest in the Navy somewhere on a ship. My wife was at the retirement home where she worked. On the way home, the sky was strangely calm as all the planes had been pinned to the ground.

The stories of courage on September 11 are remarkable, from the first responders in New York to the passengers on Flight 93 who brought the plane down before it could reach its target in Washington, DC All of these heroes overcame the fear to do what was needed to be completed. Courage is not about being fearless. It is about doing what is right and should be done despite the fear. In the military, we have learned that fear before battle is normal and good. It improves eyesight and prevents people from being reckless and endangering others.

Great leaders are courageous, not fearless and stupid. When the crowd goes the wrong way, it takes courage to overcome peer pressure and say “No.” One of the biggest challenges people face is the fear of the pain of failure. This fear keeps us from being the best we can be. We can learn from failure. At a high school lecture I was leading a few years ago, a student said, “You know you fail to score on 100% of the shots you don’t take. “ Fear of rejection or ridicule from others can also keep us from achieving our dreams.

In August 2001, the senior members of our football team made it their goal to return to the state tournament and not only play for, but win the state championship. It took courage. They knew it wouldn’t be easy. I announced their goal during a team dinner with the parents present. The boys applauded. The parents’ faces were fearful and terrified. Some shook their heads. They were afraid their sons would fail. We returned to the state football tournament. We didn’t win the state championship. It took 8 more years for this to happen. The boys were disappointed but had developed the courage to aim high and now led successful lives as doctors, lawyers, engineers and businessmen.

One of the best ways to overcome fear is to do what you fear. My daughter helped me overcome fear and doubt to run a half marathon. After running over 40 half marathons together, we had hours of running and talking without distractions or phone interruptions. My daughter was an assistant football coach in high school. The school had never had a senior women’s football coach. She had fears and doubts about her ability to do the job. My encouragement helped her continue the work when the opportunity presented itself. She is now doing a great job as a head coach.

Well-informed, experienced and moral people can be intimidated and silenced by personal attacks in the media or online. I have witnessed this first hand personally and with others. You can’t let emotion get the better of solid science, basic engineering principles and hands-on experience.

Experts must have the courage to share the truth and their concerns to prevent bad things from happening.

This week I virtually attended an energy policy conference in Virginia. There were no climate deniers among the speakers. They were very concerned about the direction of the solutions proposed by the government. The opening speaker was environmentalist Michael Shellenberger who wrote the book Apocalypse Never. He is concerned about the current policy which relies heavily on weather-dependent renewables as a solution.

He experienced power outages in California caused by reliance on wind and solar power. Michael and others have had the courage to change their minds about industrial wind and solar plants.

Michael said the North American right whale is a critically endangered species. There are currently only 100 breeding females. The Virginia offshore wind project will impact right whale breeding grounds and continues to move forward. The large windmill blades will also impact a major flyway, killing millions of birds to produce a small amount of unreliable power.

Michael said renewables require 300 times more land area than natural gas or nuclear power. Other speakers spoke of Virginia’s plan to cover more than 400,000 acres of farmland and forest, killing trees with solar panels. They said these projects will cost consumers more than $ 800 per year in increased electricity costs and damage the environment.

The presenters said the United States was already on the right track. Natural gas has helped the United States cut emissions by 22% since 2005 and is 4% ahead of the Paris targets. They see a clean future with natural gas and modern high-tech nuclear power with zero emissions, rather than using solar panels and wind turbines made in China with power from dirty coal.

Ultimately, they see hydrogen as our primary fuel for electricity and vehicles. Hydrogen vehicles do not need batteries which become hazardous waste to be disposed of.

We will be faced with situations requiring courage. It may be about making a difficult decision that will be unpopular. It could be doing what we know to be right when others want to do something immoral or unethical. It can be the fear of failure, the fear of trying something new, or the fear of telling the truths we know.

Courage is not a lack of fear. Courage is doing what we know is right and necessary or what we need to do to be successful despite our fears. Be brave.

Greg Kozera, gkozera@shalecrescentusa.com, is the Director of Marketing and Sales for Shale Crescent USA. He is a professional engineer with a master’s degree in environmental engineering with over 40 years of experience in the energy industry. He is a football coach, professional speaker, author of four books and numerous published articles.

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US, UK, Australia Forge Military Alliance Against China | Australia News https://abwr.org/us-uk-australia-forge-military-alliance-against-china-australia-news/ https://abwr.org/us-uk-australia-forge-military-alliance-against-china-australia-news/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/us-uk-australia-forge-military-alliance-against-china-australia-news/ The US, UK and Australia are establishing a trilateral security partnership to take on China, which will include helping Australia build nuclear-powered submarines. The initiative, dubbed Aukus, was jointly announced by US President Joe Biden and Prime Ministers Boris Johnson and Scott Morrison, joined virtually by videoconference. They touted it as the next critical step […]]]>

The US, UK and Australia are establishing a trilateral security partnership to take on China, which will include helping Australia build nuclear-powered submarines.

The initiative, dubbed Aukus, was jointly announced by US President Joe Biden and Prime Ministers Boris Johnson and Scott Morrison, joined virtually by videoconference. They touted it as the next critical step in an old alliance.

Morrison said teams from the three countries will work out a joint plan over the next 18 months to assemble Australia’s new fleet of nuclear-powered submarines, which will be built in Adelaide. The project will make Australia the seventh country in the world to have submarines powered by nuclear reactors.

“This will include a thorough review of what we need to do to exercise our nuclear management responsibilities here in Australia,” said the Prime Minister of Australia, referring to international treaty obligations on the handling of nuclear fuel. Morrison added, “But let me be clear. Australia is not seeking to acquire nuclear weapons or to establish civilian nuclear capability. “

None of the three leaders mentioned China, but there was no doubt that the initiative was a response to China’s expansionist push in the South China Sea and growing belligerence towards Taiwan.

“We must be able to cope with both the current strategic environment in the region and its potential evolution, as the future of each of our nations and the world depends on a free and open Indo-Pacific,” sustainable and flourishing in the decades to come, ”said Biden.

Speaking from London, Johnson said the three countries were “natural allies” even though “we may be geographically separated” and said the alliance would create “a new defense partnership and create jobs and prosperity “.

Regarding Australia’s submarine building plan, Johnson said: “This will be one of the most complex and technically demanding projects in the world, lasting decades and requiring the most advanced technology.

A senior US official described the deal as “a fundamental decision, which decisively binds Australia to the US and Britain for generations.”

The deal ends a $ 90 billion contract Australia signed with French company Naval Group in 2016. The deal got bogged down in cost overruns, delays and design changes. It marks a setback for President Emmanuel Macron.

“The world is a jungle,” observed on Twitter the former French ambassador to Washington, Gérard Araud. “France has just been reminded of this bitter truth by the way the United States and the United Kingdom stabbed her in the back in Australia. That’s life.”

Naval Group, which had been tasked with building 12 state-of-the-art attack-class submarines, said the new agreement was a “big disappointment.”

Australia insists it has no plans to pursue nuclear weapons and will abide by the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), but critics said the move could still indirectly boost the proliferation of arms.

Any new nuclear-powered submarine, powered by enriched uranium, will take years – perhaps more than a decade – to develop. But once at sea, the goal is to put Australia’s currently diesel-powered navy on a technological par with the Chinese navy, the largest in the world.

In addition to cooperation on naval technology, the partnership will involve closer alignment of regional policies and actions, and greater integration of the military and defense industries of the three allies. The three also intend to work together on cyber warfare and artificial intelligence capabilities.

British officials have said they hope the UK will benefit from defense companies supplying technology to Australia. Rolls-Royce, based in Derby, supplies reactors for Royal Navy submarines, which are ultimately decommissioned in the UK when they run out. But it’s not yet clear how Australia’s reactors will be powered or decommissioned.

The formation of Aukus comes at a time of increasing tensions, particularly over the South China Sea and Taiwan. A new book on the final weeks of the Donald Trump administration said that at the end of 2020, the United States became concerned that China was increasingly convinced that it would be the target of a preemptive attack.

According to Peril, by Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Robert Costa, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Mark Milley twice called his Chinese counterpart, General Li Zuocheng, to reassure him that no attack would take place and that Milley give a warning if Trump issues such an order.

In July, the new British aircraft carrier, the Queen Elizabeth, arrived in the South China Sea, the focal point of US-China tensions, triggering denunciations from Beijing. The US Secretary of Defense, Lloyd Austin, welcomed the deployment at the time, but wondered “are there areas where the UK can be more useful in other parts of the world”.

A senior US official suggested that the UK government had pushed for an increased role in the region.

“Britain is very focused on the concept of a global Britain, and their inclination is to engage much more deeply with the Indo-Pacific and that’s a down payment on that effort,” the official said. .

Until now, the United States had only shared its nuclear propulsion technology with the United Kingdom, as part of an agreement dating back to 1958, but a senior American official said: “This is of a unique set of circumstances.

Nuclear power will allow Australia’s attack submarines to stay at sea for up to five months and operate quieter than the country’s existing Collins-class diesel ships, allowing them to better evade enemy detection.

Some critics of the deal warn that it sets a dangerous precedent for countries to exploit a loophole in the NPT. The treaty allows non-nuclear-weapon countries to build nuclear-powered submarines and remove the fissile material they need for submarine reactors from stockpiles monitored by the global watchdog, the Agency. atomic energy international, opening up the possibility that they could be diverted towards the manufacture of weapons. Australia would be the first country to use this loophole.

“My fear is not that Australia is misusing the nuclear material we give it and using the loophole to manufacture nuclear weapons,” said James Acton, nuclear policy program co-chair of the Carnegie Endowment for International. Peace. “What concerns me is that this sets a terrible precedent that other countries could abuse. “Iran is the obvious example here. We would be doing bullshit if Iran removed nuclear material from safeguards. “

David Cullen of the Nuclear Information Service said: “It has only happened once in history when the United States helped the United Kingdom develop its first nuclear-powered submarines.

“What’s interesting is that the US seems to have cast a bone in the UK by allowing Britain to help design and build Australia’s new submarines,” Cullen said. “The question will be how the Australians will be supplied and whether they want to develop their own nuclear capacity to enrich uranium fuel.”

British sources said the talks on the nuclear power deal were initiated by the Australians in March.


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Nuclear waste in the oil zone? Federal government initiates clash with Texas https://abwr.org/nuclear-waste-in-the-oil-zone-federal-government-initiates-clash-with-texas/ https://abwr.org/nuclear-waste-in-the-oil-zone-federal-government-initiates-clash-with-texas/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 11:49:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/nuclear-waste-in-the-oil-zone-federal-government-initiates-clash-with-texas/ A West Texas site now has a federal license to store used nuclear fuel, creating a potential showdown with heads of state who object to the prospect of attracting high-level radioactive waste from all the countries. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission announcement the license for Interim Storage Partners LLC to build and operate an interim storage […]]]>

A West Texas site now has a federal license to store used nuclear fuel, creating a potential showdown with heads of state who object to the prospect of attracting high-level radioactive waste from all the countries.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission announcement the license for Interim Storage Partners LLC to build and operate an interim storage facility in Andrews County, Texas on Monday – just days after Republican Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed a bill aimed at restricting the storage of nuclear waste in the State.

Yesterday, Abbott attempted to use the new license in the Permian Basin oilfield to hammer President Biden away, although an application for the site was filed in 2016 and the Trump administration did not kill the project. .

“Administrator Biden Tries to Dump Highly Radioactive Nuclear Waste in West Texas Oil Fields,” Abbott noted on Twitter. “I just signed a law to stop it. Texas will not become America’s dumping ground for nuclear waste.

David McIntyre, an NRC spokesperson, declined to comment on the governor’s criticism, but said in a statement this week that “the licensing decision was made in accordance with applicable federal laws and regulations after technical reviews and in-depth, multi-year environmental issues “.

The tragedy is being watched by the electricity industry, as nuclear power plants continue to store spent fuel on site without a permanent repository in the United States. Yucca Mountain in Nevada has failed to garner enough sustained support to be an option (Daily E&E, 22nd of July). Meanwhile, backers of the Interim Storage Partners, or ISP, site in West Texas and a separate East New Mexico project from Holtec International have pursued interim storage proposals that could last. decades.

The NRC said this was the second license it issued for a consolidated storage facility for spent nuclear fuel. The first took place in 2006 for a different facility that was not built. A decision on Holtec’s application for a site in Lea County, New Mexico, is expected in January, according to the nuclear safety authority. Opposition to Holtec’s plan also erupted in New Mexico.

It remains to be seen how the West Texas proposal proceeds from there. The ISP could directly challenge Texas’ position or take a more conciliatory and wait-and-see approach before seeking to move forward.

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, in response to a question from E&E News yesterday, said its “role is NOT to issue permits under the jurisdiction of the TCEQ as stated in the wording of the bill “if permits are sought for a high-level radioactive waste facility in the state such as the FAI site.”

In a statement released yesterday, ISP said that “the proposed facility would be located adjacent to the existing low-level nuclear material disposal facility of Waste Control Specialists in Andrews County, Texas.” ISP is a joint venture of Waste Control Specialists and Orano USA, with the support of a technology provider called NAC International. A revised license application was submitted in 2018.

The PSI said the federal clearance was based on a comprehensive, multi-year review. The company has not indicated its next move or provided answers to questions posed by E&E News.

“The in-depth analyzes concluded that the commercial operations of temporary storage and transport of this facility meet all environmental, health and safety requirements without negatively impacting nearby residents or existing industries,” said ISP said in its statement.

Critics noted safety concerns for people living in West Texas, as well as concerns about the transport of nuclear waste across the country.

“There were no surprises in the NRC’s Twitter announcement regarding approval of the license to store deadly nuclear waste in Texas,” said Karen Hadden, executive director of Sustainable Energy & Economic Development Coalition, in a statement to E&E News. “There was no recognition of the overwhelming opposition in all of Texas. Just the federal government running our state for the benefit of a private company. “

“Really interesting moments”

In a statement ahead of the NRC’s announcement this week, Hadden said opponents “will continue to fight” even if the new license is issued. She said legal challenges remained and she expressed hope that the Texas attorney general would fight to protect people. A body of county commissioners in Andrews County, Texas, also supported a resolution against the storage of high-level nuclear waste this year, CBS local affiliate KOSA said. reported.

The recently signed Texas bill, HB 7, garnered broad support at a recent special session in Texas. The measure aims to prevent a state commission from issuing certain permits related to a potential installation. There are exceptions for the storage of highly radioactive waste, such as at sites of nuclear reactors currently or formerly in operation.

“NRC document grants clearance conclusively determining that consolidated storage of nuclear waste could be carried out safely by ISP,” Rod Baltzer, longtime member of the nuclear industry, noted on Twitter. “A document from the governor of Texas says not so fast. Really interesting moments.

Baltzer is the COO of Deep Isolation, a company related to nuclear waste disposal. He is a former Managing Director of Waste Control Specialists and has appeared in public to advocate for possible West Texas interim storage in the past (Energy wire, February 24, 2017).

The NRC said it has authorized ISP to store up to 5,000 metric tonnes of spent fuel and 231.3 metric tonnes of low-level radioactive waste above Class C for 40 years. Such materials may require more stringent disposal or storage methods. NRC noted the potential for phased expansion to a possible capacity of 40,000 metric tonnes of fuel. The commission said each expansion would require a license amendment and additional environmental and safety reviews.

Fred Beach, a professor at the University of Texas at Austin, said the federal government was on the verge of finding a storage solution for used nuclear fuel. He said he supported the concept of consolidated interim storage, including at the proposed site in West Texas.

The Nuclear Energy Institute, an industry group, congratulated ISP on obtaining the permit from the NRC for the construction and operation of the consolidated interim storage facility for used fuel.

“If built, this facility would become an important part of our country’s clean energy infrastructure,” Rodney McCullum, senior director of decommissioning and used fuel at NEI, said in a statement.

In view of the legislative action in Texas, he encouraged the parties to work together.

“NEI believes that a program to establish an integrated nuclear waste management system – which should include both consolidated interim storage facilities and permanent geological storage capacity – should be reinstated and we commit to working with it. ‘administration, Congress and the Department of Energy in their efforts to address the management of used fuel, ”McCullum said.

Abbott, meanwhile, wrote to the NRC last November to say he strongly opposed ISP’s proposal for an interim storage facility in Texas and suggested it could affect states’ energy security. -United as a target of terrorists in a major oil-producing region. He sent another letter this month, highlighting his recent signing of HB 7. He urged the NRC to deny the license application.

“Now the state has made it clear that a consolidated interim storage facility is not only intrusive here, but illegal,” Abbott wrote in the September 10 letter.

The NRC issued its permit for the facility the following Monday, the next business day.



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US grants license for temporary nuclear waste dump in Texas https://abwr.org/us-grants-license-for-temporary-nuclear-waste-dump-in-texas/ https://abwr.org/us-grants-license-for-temporary-nuclear-waste-dump-in-texas/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 10:22:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/us-grants-license-for-temporary-nuclear-waste-dump-in-texas/ WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal officials have paved the way for building a landfill in West Texas that could hold used nuclear fuel for up to 40 years. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has licensed Interim Storage Partners LLC to construct and operate a facility that can accommodate up to 5,000 metric tonnes of spent nuclear fuel […]]]>

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal officials have paved the way for building a landfill in West Texas that could hold used nuclear fuel for up to 40 years.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has licensed Interim Storage Partners LLC to construct and operate a facility that can accommodate up to 5,000 metric tonnes of spent nuclear fuel rods from power plants and 231 million tonnes of other radioactive waste.

The move puts the federal agency on a collision course with officials in the state of Texas, where opposition to the storage of nuclear waste has grown for years.

Last week, Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed a bill that purports to ban the storage or transportation of high-level nuclear waste such as spent fuel rods across the state.

“Texas is not going to become America’s nuclear waste dump,” Abbott tweeted Tuesday.

Environmental groups, including the Sierra Club, have filed federal lawsuits to block the project, arguing that the discovery of groundwater beneath the site makes it dangerous to store radioactive waste there.

Interim storage partners plan to build the facility next to an existing landfill in Andrews County for low-level waste such as protective clothing and other materials that have been exposed to radioactivity. The company plans to expand the interim facility in seven phases to accommodate up to 40,000 tonnes of high-level waste, which would be stored in sealed containers. Each expansion would require NRC review and approval.

The company is a joint venture of Waste Control Specialists LLC, which was started by the late billionaire Dallas investor Harold Simmons and subsequently acquired by private equity firm JF Lehman & Co. and Orano USA. Waste control specialists applied for the license in 2015.

The Andrews County site is located approximately 563.27 kilometers west of Dallas, near the Texas-New Mexico border.

New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham and the state’s Congressional delegation oppose a proposal by Holtec International to build a similar temporary nuclear waste facility in Lea County. They say the technical analysis of the site was inadequate.

New Mexico officials fear the waste could be stranded in their state because the federal government has failed for decades to find a permanent disposal site. Instead, highly radioactive waste is piling up in dozens of reactors across the country.

In 2006, the NRC approved a proposal for a temporary spent fuel dump in Utah, but the facility was never built.

In the 1980s, the Department of Energy and Congress approved the construction of a deep and permanent underground landfill in southern Nevada. State officials fought the project for years, however, and Congress cut its funding in 2011 while Harry Reid, a Democrat from Nevada, was the Senate Majority Leader.


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11 places he hides from you https://abwr.org/11-places-he-hides-from-you/ https://abwr.org/11-places-he-hides-from-you/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 07:47:39 +0000 https://abwr.org/11-places-he-hides-from-you/ Google maps is probably one of the most used applications in the world. Over the years, Google Maps has become the primary tool people use to find directions, check traffic conditions, and find locations with Street View. Today we live in a time when you literally have the world in the palm of your hand. […]]]>

Google maps is probably one of the most used applications in the world. Over the years, Google Maps has become the primary tool people use to find directions, check traffic conditions, and find locations with Street View.

Today we live in a time when you literally have the world in the palm of your hand. You can explore the entire planet from the comfort of your home.

But did you know that there are few secret places on earth that are not visible even on Google Maps because they are either pixelated or blurry for different reasons? From mysterious islands to military bases and even a random house in Stockton-on-Tees, there are plenty of secret places on earth that Google Maps won’t show you, here are a few.

1. Moruroa Island – French Polynesia

Secrets of Google Maps | Google maps

While you will be able to see that half of this island is clear, the other half looks blurry. According to reports, the French carried out nuclear tests on Mururoa between 1966 and 1996. In addition, this island is off-limits to visitors.

Click here for seen

2. 2207 Seymour Avenue, Ohio – United States

2207 Seymour Avenue, Ohio - United States
2207 Seymour Avenue, Ohio – United States | Google maps

2207 Seymour Avenue is completely hidden no matter how hard you try to zoom in, and for good reason. This is the place where Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight were held captive and abused by Ariel Castro for nearly a decade.

Click here for seen

3. A house in Stockton-on-Tees – UK

A house in Stockton-on-Tees - UK
A house in Stockton-on-Tees – United Kingdom | Google maps

Princeport Road in Stockton-on-Tees hosts a fuzzy house, and it’s unclear why.

Click here for seen

4. Kos International Airport – Greece

Kos International Airport - Greece
Kos International Airport – Greece | Google maps

Kos International Airport is located on the island of Kos in Greece. Kos International Airport appears blurry on Google Maps. Apparently, the airport serves charter airlines that bring visitors to the island, which remains most active during the summer months.

Click here for seen

5. Jeannette Island – Russia

Ile Jeannette - Russia
Jeannette Island – Russia | Google maps

Jeannette Island is a small island in the East Siberian Sea, measuring only 2 km long. The island is mostly covered in ice and has a peak of 1,152 feet in the center. It’s unclear exactly why the island is blurry, although there have been issues as to whether the island belongs to Russia or the United States.

Click here for seen

6. North Korea

North Korea
North Korea | Google maps

North Korea is a secret country as it is. Making it even more secret is the fact that you can’t see any details of it on Google Maps. You will only find names of towns and green mountains.

Click here for seen

7. Amchitka Island – Alaska

Amchitka Island - Alaska
Amchitka Island – Alaska | Google maps

If you search for this island, you will see that more than half of the island is out of focus. According to records, Amchitka was selected by the United States Atomic Energy Commission in the late 1950s to be the site for underground nuclear tests.

According to some reports, three underground nuclear tests were carried out on this island. Today, this island is monitored for any leakage of radioactive materials; the island is expected to become a restricted access wildlife reserve in 2025.

Click here for seen

8. Cattenom Nuclear Power Plant – France

Cattenom Nuclear Power Plant - France
Cattenom Nuclear Power Plant – France | Google maps

The Cattenom nuclear power plant is a nuclear power plant located in the Grand Est of the municipality of Cattenom, in France, on the Moselle between Thionville and Trèves. It is close to the city of Luxembourg and Metz. It is the ninth largest nuclear power plant in the world.

Click here for seen

9. Marcoule nuclear site – France

Marcoule Nuclear Site - France
Marcoule Nuclear Site – France | Google maps

Marcoule, inaugurated in 1955, is one of the oldest nuclear sites in France, although it has been extensively modernized. It is located in the Gard department in the Languedoc-Roussillon region, near the French Mediterranean coast. If you want to see the Marcoule nuclear site in France on Google Maps, you will not be able to do so because the entire site appears pixelated on the maps.

Click here for seen

10. Polish Special Forces Base, Poland

Polish Special Forces Base, Poland
Polish Special Forces Base, Poland | Google maps

Dowodztwo Wojsk Specjalnych, the Polish Special Forces Command, is censored on Google Maps. The DWS (Dowodztwo Wojsk Specjalnych) was responsible for the command and training of Polish special forces, although a different organization is now dealing with this.

Click here for seen

11. Patio de los Naranjos – Spain

Patio de los Naranjos - Spain
Patio de los Naranjos – Spain | Google maps

The hidden location is called Patio de los Naranjos, which translates to Orange Tree Yard. No matter how far the viewer zooms in on the map, however, nothing of the courtyard can be seen – it remains blurry. It is not known why the Patio de los Naranjos was hidden from public view.

Click here for seen


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Breakthrough in nuclear fusion: what do the new findings mean for the future of energy? https://abwr.org/breakthrough-in-nuclear-fusion-what-do-the-new-findings-mean-for-the-future-of-energy/ https://abwr.org/breakthrough-in-nuclear-fusion-what-do-the-new-findings-mean-for-the-future-of-energy/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 06:29:26 +0000 https://abwr.org/breakthrough-in-nuclear-fusion-what-do-the-new-findings-mean-for-the-future-of-energy/ A color enhanced image of the interior of a NIF preamplifier support structure. Photo: Damien Jemison / US NIF / DoE There are two possible ways to achieve nuclear fusion: magnetic confinement and inertial confinement. On August 8, the US National Ignition Facility achieved historic energy production of 1.3 megajoules using the inertial approach. While […]]]>

A color enhanced image of the interior of a NIF preamplifier support structure. Photo: Damien Jemison / US NIF / DoE


  • There are two possible ways to achieve nuclear fusion: magnetic confinement and inertial confinement.
  • On August 8, the US National Ignition Facility achieved historic energy production of 1.3 megajoules using the inertial approach.
  • While this new breakthrough is exciting, it should be borne in mind that fusion will be a source of energy for the second half of the century – at the earliest.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory announced a major breakthrough in nuclear fusion, using powerful lasers to produce 1.3 megajoules of energy – about 3% of the energy contained in 1 kg of crude oil.

Nuclear fusion has long been viewed as the energy of the future – an “infinite” source of energy that does not rely on the need to burn carbon. But after decades of research, it has yet to deliver on its exciting promise.

How close does this new breakthrough bring us to the desired results? Here’s a quick overview to put this new scientific breakthrough into perspective.

What is nuclear fusion?

There are two ways to use nuclear energy: fission, which is used in modern nuclear power plants, and fusion.

In fission, heavy uranium atoms are broken down into smaller atoms to release energy. Nuclear fusion is the reverse process: light atoms are transformed into heavier atoms to release energy, the same process that occurs in the plasma nucleus of the Sun.

A fusion reactor boosts power: the triggered reaction must produce more energy than is needed to heat the fuel plasma for energy production to occur – this is called the ignition. No one has managed to do it yet. The current record was set in 1997 by the Joint European Torus in the UK, where 16 MW of power was generated by magnetic fusion, but it took 23 MW to trigger it.

Inside the fusion chamber of Tokamak DIII-D, San Diego. Photo: Rswilcox / Flickr, CC BY-SA

There are two possible ways to achieve nuclear fusion: magnetic confinement, which uses strong magnets to confine the plasma for very long periods of time, and inertial confinement, which uses very powerful and short laser pulses to compress the fuel and trigger. the fusion reaction.

Historically, magnetic fusion has been favored because the technology necessary for inertial fusion, in particular lasers, was not available. Inertial fusion also requires much higher gains to compensate for the energy consumed by lasers.

Inertial containment

The two largest inertial projects are the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the United States and the MegaJoule Laser in France, whose applications are mainly military and financed by defense programs. Both facilities simulate nuclear explosions for research purposes, although the NIF also conducts energy research.

The NIF uses 192 laser beams that produce a total of 1.9 megajoules of energy over a period of nanoseconds to trigger the fusion reaction. The fuel is placed inside a metal capsule a few millimeters in diameter, which, when heated by lasers, emits x-rays which heat and compress the fuel.

It is this process that, on August 8, 2021, reached the historic energy production of 1.3 megajoule, the highest value ever recorded by the inertial approach: that is, the closest to ignition.

The overall gain of 0.7 is equivalent to the record reached by the JET in 1997 using magnetic confinement, but in this case, the fuel absorbed 0.25 megajoules of energy and generated 1.3 megajoules: thus the fusion generated much of the heat required for the reaction, approaching the ignition point.

However, a reactor will have to achieve much higher gains (more than 100) to be economically attractive.

Magnetic containment

The magnetic confinement approach promises better development prospects and is therefore the preferred route for energy production to date.

The vast majority of research focuses on tokamaks, fusion reactors invented in the USSR in the 1960s, where the plasma is confined by a strong magnetic field.

ITER, a demonstration reactor under construction in the south of France involving 35 countries, uses the tokamak configuration. It will be the largest fusion reactor in the world, and aims to demonstrate a gain of 10 – the plasma will be heated by 50 MW of power and is expected to generate 500 MW. The first plasma is now officially expected by the end of 2025, with a fusion demonstration expected in the late 2030s.

The UK recently launched the spherical tokamak for power generation (STAGE) which aims to develop a reactor that connects to the energy grid in the 2040s. China is also pursuing a ambitious program produce isotopes of tritium and electricity in the 2040s. Finally, Europe plans to open another tokamak demonstrator, DEMO, in the 2050s.

Another configuration called the stellarator, like that of Germany Wendelstein-7X, shows very good results. Although the performance of a stellarator is lower than what a tokamak can achieve, its inherent stability and promising recent results make it a serious alternative.

The future of fusion

Meanwhile, private nuclear fusion projects have exploded in recent years. Most of them envision a fusion reaction in the next ten to twenty years and together have attracted $ 2 billion in funding get ahead of the traditional development sector.

Two different scenarios of nuclear fusion deployment, compared to wind, solar and nuclear fission. Image Title: G. De Temmerman, D. Chuard, J.-B. Rudelle for Zenon Research, author provided

If these initiatives use other innovative technologies to achieve fusion and could thus very well deliver operational reactors quickly, the deployment of a fleet of reactors around the world will necessarily take time.

If development follows this accelerated path, nuclear fusion could account for around 1% of global energy demand by 2060.

So while this new breakthrough is exciting, it should be borne in mind that fusion will be a source of energy for the second half of the century – at the earliest.The conversation

Greg De Temmerman, Associate researcher at Mines ParisTech-PSL; Managing Director of Zenon Research, Mines ParisTech.

This article was first published by The conversation and has been republished here under a Creative Commons license.


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IAEA sees continued progress at Fukushima Daiichi: Regulation and safety https://abwr.org/iaea-sees-continued-progress-at-fukushima-daiichi-regulation-and-safety/ https://abwr.org/iaea-sees-continued-progress-at-fukushima-daiichi-regulation-and-safety/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 13:22:28 +0000 https://abwr.org/iaea-sees-continued-progress-at-fukushima-daiichi-regulation-and-safety/ August 27, 2021 Conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant site have improved since a review in 2018 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) concluded following its fifth review of Japan’s plans and activities for decommission the plant. The IAEA team of experts reviewed the current situation at the site and future plans in […]]]>

August 27, 2021

Conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant site have improved since a review in 2018 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) concluded following its fifth review of Japan’s plans and activities for decommission the plant. The IAEA team of experts reviewed the current situation at the site and future plans in areas such as spent fuel disposal and recovery of fuel debris, radioactive waste, water and site management.

Review team leader Christophe Xerri visited the Fukushima Daiichi site under strict COVID-19 protection measures to gain first-hand information on conditions there and progress towards the decommissioning of the site (Image: Tepco)

The 12-member team – including nine from the IAEA and one from Indonesia, the United Kingdom and the United States – carried out a two-month review mission from June 30 to August 27. The mission, which followed two previous reviews in 2013, one in 2015 and one in 2018, was carried out at the request of the Japanese government. The review included a combination of online discussions, face-to-face meetings in Vienna and Tokyo, and a visit to the Fukushima Daiichi site.

The team said Japan has made significant progress since the accident by moving from an emergency to a stable situation, managing day-to-day activities at the site, reducing risks to the workforce. work and the environment and planning decommissioning with a systematic industrial approach.

Site conditions have further improved since the previous IAEA review in 2018, with decreased production of contaminated water, safe draining of a spent fuel pool, better understanding of reactor fuel debris , new waste management facilities and measures against extreme tsunamis. and earthquakes. However, the decommissioning environment remains complex and challenging, the team added.

The latest review came just months after Japan decided in April how to dispose of the large amounts of treated water that has accumulated at the site since the accident. The 2018 mission had advised Japan to take an urgent decision on the matter, and this year’s mission welcomed a decision that was made, saying it would facilitate the entire decommissioning plan.

To help meet the future challenges of a decommissioning project that is expected to last for several decades, the review team encouraged Japan to start allocating sufficient resources to plan and prepare activities beyond the next 10 years until. ‘at the end of the work.

Recommendations

In its report to the Japanese authorities today, the team acknowledged a number of achievements since the 2018 mission, including: strengthening project management; risk reduction measures, such as the completion of the emptying of the spent fuel pool in Unit 3 in February; and, a better understanding of the presence of fuel debris in Units 1 to 3 and the development, with UK support, of a one-of-a-kind robotic arm for a fuel debris recovery test from the United Kingdom. unit 2 in 2022.

The review team encouraged Japan to continue to implement and improve its strategy for safe and effective decommissioning. Further development of human resources in areas such as project management will be vital in this regard, he said. The team of experts also suggested the application of circular economy principles to maximize efficiency and reduce waste.

The team noted that the information currently being collected on the fuel debris, as well as the experience that will be gained from their recovery from Unit 2, will be used in the development of options for the next steps, in particular regarding the units 1 and 3.

In addition, the team provided advice on more specific organizational and technical areas, including: developing planning scenarios for the entire decommissioning program, including all reactor units, and aging management. recently built support facilities on site; Complete characterization of fuel debris to identify key parameters that will allow the design of future strategies, including potential processing and conditioning, to manage these materials from initial storage to disposal; continue to develop management to optimize the use of site space and labor logistics; conduct surveys to assess how the public awareness program contributes to building public confidence in decommissioning activities; and strengthening international cooperation to ensure both that Japan benefits from external solutions and experience for safe and effective decommissioning and that it makes its knowledge and expertise available internationally. acquired as a result of the accident.

“The decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi is a particularly complex and demanding undertaking that requires substantial technical skills and expertise as well as large-scale project management and experience,” said team leader Christophe Xerri, director of the IAEA Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Division. Technology. “Japan has continued to make impressive progress since our previous review mission three years ago.

“A successful decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi over the next two to three decades will require disciplined program and project management to deal with significant risks and uncertainties, a continued focus on safety culture and new scientific and technological developments. “

Research and writing by World Nuclear News




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West Texas radioactive waste disposal debate reignites on Greg Abbott special session agenda https://abwr.org/west-texas-radioactive-waste-disposal-debate-reignites-on-greg-abbott-special-session-agenda/ https://abwr.org/west-texas-radioactive-waste-disposal-debate-reignites-on-greg-abbott-special-session-agenda/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 19:37:50 +0000 https://abwr.org/west-texas-radioactive-waste-disposal-debate-reignites-on-greg-abbott-special-session-agenda/ WASHINGTON – Debate over plans for a new facility in West Texas that would store spent nuclear fuel from across the country was reignited after Governor Greg Abbott included efforts to limit high-level radioactive waste in the State on its agenda for the extraordinary session. Representative Brooks Landgraf, R-Odessa, represents Andrews County, where a company […]]]>

WASHINGTON – Debate over plans for a new facility in West Texas that would store spent nuclear fuel from across the country was reignited after Governor Greg Abbott included efforts to limit high-level radioactive waste in the State on its agenda for the extraordinary session.

Representative Brooks Landgraf, R-Odessa, represents Andrews County, where a company called Interim Storage Solutions has requested the construction of a storage facility for used nuclear fuel, which is considered high level waste, until that the federal government could establish an ultimate long-term site – although it is not clear when that would be, and it could take years.

With busy interstate highways and railroads crossing the Dallas-Fort Worth area, including the Interstate 20 corridor, environmental groups have warned for years that high-level waste could move through D-FW towards County of Andrews if the installation is approved. .

Abbott included the issue on his agenda for the Second Special Session of the Legislative Assembly, and Landgraf introduced a bill that would ban the transport, storage and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the state. .

The bill has one important exception: nuclear and research reactors already in Texas could continue to store their spent fuel on-site, as they did. The bill would not allow the transport of high level waste to the proposed Andrews County facility.

In Texas, there are two commercial nuclear reactors: the Comanche Peak nuclear power plant in Glen Rose, southwest of Fort Worth, and the South Texas project in Bay City, southwest of Houston. Texas A&M University at College Station and UT-Austin both have research reactors on their campuses.

Interim Storage is a joint venture between Waste Control Specialists, which has been disposing of low-level radioactive waste in Andrews County for years, and Orano USA, a subsidiary of one of the world’s largest nuclear energy companies.

“My job is to represent the people of Andrews County. Full stop, ”Landgraf said in a press release Thursday. “It’s clear: Andrews supports the existing low-level facility, but opposes its expansion to store much more radioactive high-level waste. “

Landgraf introduced a similar bill during the regular session, but it was blocked after other members opposed the abolition of state fees that would have given waste control specialists.

State lawmakers, both Republicans and Democrats, have already made it clear that they oppose the proposed installation. The two Abbott and state democrats wrote to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the government agency responsible for approving Interim Storage Solutions’ request, to say that it does not support it.

In July, 63 members of the Texas Democratic House and Senate signed a letter to the chairman of the committee noting that “resolutions opposing the consolidated interim storage and transportation of nuclear waste have been passed by five counties and three cities. of Texas, as well as by the Midland Chamber of Commerce. Collectively, this represents the voices of 5.4 million Texans.

Dale Klein, former chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and associate vice chancellor for research at the UT system, said he did not think Landgraf’s bill would affect the agency’s assessment of the demand for ‘Interim Storage Solutions.

The commission should assess the application on technical merit for safety and security, he said.

Klein argues that, from a federal perspective, it would be advantageous to have a central interim storage facility to house used nuclear fuel.

“As a nation, it would make sense to have a central storage facility, especially for sites where reactors are already shut down, and the only thing left is their storage of spent fuel,” he said. -he declares. “Certainly, wherever it is done, it will have to be regulated by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, so it will be done in a safe and secure manner. “

Klein said the facility, if approved, will create new jobs and a new industry in the area. And on safety concerns, he said the risks associated with transporting and storing spent nuclear fuel are low.

“There have been no issues in the storage of this material to date,” Klein said. “There is no reason to believe that the storage in West Texas would be any different from that of the 35 existing sites, including two in Texas.

But lawmakers and environmental groups are sounding the alarm.

In his letter to the committee last year, Abbott said the proposed facility “jeopardizes America’s energy security as it would be a prime target for attacks by terrorists, saboteurs and other enemies.” .

Karen Hadden, executive director of the Austin-based Sustainable Energy and Economic Development Coalition, an alliance of organizations and businesses that opposes Interim Storage Solutions’ plans, said it was clear Texans were not did not want the installation.

“We don’t want it; it should be clear as of the day that Texas doesn’t want this waste, ”Hadden said. “They would transport it across the country with enormous risk… and put it in one place, here.” And now what? We were stuck. “

Hadden said the organization was concerned about the potential of spent fuel, which can remain dangerously radioactive for hundreds of thousands of years, spills and leaks in accidents during transport. He also fears that during storage, the waste could contaminate the Ogallala aquifer, which extends in this region from West Texas.

“Texas could get stuck with this cracking, freezing and leaking stuff in the desert next to the Ogallala Aquifer, our nation’s largest freshwater aquifer,” she said. “It really is a horrible plan in an area which has increasing earthquakes. “

In July, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a environmental impact report for the proposed installation, asserting that “there would be no long-term impact on land resources from the implementation of the proposal [Consolidated Interim Storage Facility] project.”

The commission’s final decision on Interim Storage Solutions’ application could come anytime after September 13, when the agency the final exam period ends.

“The management of used nuclear fuel is truly unique in that this approach has been proven for decades to ensure the safety of the public, workers and the environment,” said Jeff Isakson, CEO of Interim Storage Partners , in a press release to The morning news from Dallas. “For the proposed interim storage facility, we spent almost a decade and millions of dollars to ensure we fully meet all safety standards.”

In the legislature, it is not clear whether Landgraf’s new bill will reach the governor’s office. Texas House only recently reached quorum after a standoff of several months, and there are 16 other items on the agenda on the appeal of the second extraordinary session.

“There are a lot of legislative items on the menu, and the friction between the parties is so strong,” said Brandon Rottinghaus, professor of political science at the University of Houston. “Getting things done, even when there is consensus on what to do, can be a challenge. “

On Monday, the Texas House Committee on Environmental Regulation met to discuss Landgraf’s bill. Many witnesses who testified at the hearing opposed the legislation, arguing that it does not have enough teeth to prevent the transport of high-level waste into the state.

“We would like to be in favor of this bill, but what is needed is a really clear ban,” said Tom “Smitty” Smith, a representative of the public interest organization Public. Citizen.

Smith and some other opponents want the bill to cover a wider range of waste, but committee members voted 6 to 1 to favorably bring the bill out of committee without any further amendments, meaning that ‘ it could be submitted to the plenary chamber later this week.


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Ample raises $ 160 million from Shell and others for battery exchange stations for electric vehicles – pv magazine usa https://abwr.org/ample-raises-160-million-from-shell-and-others-for-battery-exchange-stations-for-electric-vehicles-pv-magazine-usa/ https://abwr.org/ample-raises-160-million-from-shell-and-others-for-battery-exchange-stations-for-electric-vehicles-pv-magazine-usa/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 13:00:29 +0000 https://abwr.org/ample-raises-160-million-from-shell-and-others-for-battery-exchange-stations-for-electric-vehicles-pv-magazine-usa/ Also getting started: ROSI recycles at multiple stages of the PV lifecycle, and Comcast Ventures is leading a funding round for a provider of AI-powered home energy upgrades. August 22, 2021 Ryan kennedy In this episode of Startup Sunday, we have three companies making potentially disruptive innovations in solar power, home power, and electric vehicles. […]]]>

Also getting started: ROSI recycles at multiple stages of the PV lifecycle, and Comcast Ventures is leading a funding round for a provider of AI-powered home energy upgrades.

In this episode of Startup Sunday, we have three companies making potentially disruptive innovations in solar power, home power, and electric vehicles.

Ample Modular EV Battery Swap station

Ample of San Francisco has raised $ 160 million in Series C funding to recharge its modular, swappable EV battery system. The society emerged stealth operations in March after seven years, and is now seeking to develop commercially viable automated battery exchange stations.

Ample’s backers include Shell, Repsol, Japanese company Eneos, and Thai company PTT.

The goal of an Ample battery swap station is to eliminate the need for recharging, allowing drivers to drive with a nearly depleted battery and leave with a fully charged battery. The exchange can happen in under 10 minutes, Ample said.

Sufficient battery exchange station.

Image: Ample

Ample is based on a set of small Lego brick shaped batteries that are compatible with many different electric vehicle models. The light and prefabricated design of the station should enable rapid deployment, Ample said. When not actively swapping batteries, the station can act as an energy storage capsule, capturing renewable energy.

The company said its station would provide a full charge 3-10 times cheaper than current fast-charging stations, be cheaper to build and install, and be able to provide power at a cost of 10 to 20% lower than gas.

The company said it takes around 20 uses of vehicles at a station to break even.

Currently, five Ample battery stations are operational in San Francisco. The company said this new round of funding will drive growth in the United States and internationally.

ROSI the Unriveur

As panel production soars, the same will apply for the supply of end-of-life modules, which are often more profitable to send to landfill than to recycle. French company ROSI aims to change this by extracting value from decommissioned solar panels. Think of him as a sort of reverse Rosie the Riviter.

Maybe ROSI says “we can undo it!” “?

ROSI said its process allows for deep separation of the laminate materials. Its process uses physical, thermal and soft chemistry to collect both the ultra-pure silicon from the cell and the silver fingers that collect the electrical current generated by each cell. Together, these materials represent over 60% of the cost of a panel, said ROSI.

ROSI said its process differs from the type of aggressive chemical reaction process that other PV recyclers are currently using.

ROSI recycles at the end of the cut and at the end of its life.

Image: Solar ROSI

ROSI also reuses silicon waste, or “kerf”, into recycled ultrapure silicon. When silicon ingots are cut into wafers, a diamond wire slices through the material, but over 40% of the silicon is lost as microchips which are drained from the liquid used in the cutting process.

These sludges contain pure silicon and are currently considered waste to be disposed of at the manufacturer’s expense. The ROSI process separates the silicon fragments from the sawing liquid and reuses the granules to make more silicon ingots.

The startup founded in 2017 recently announced its intention to build a recycling facility in Grenoble, France. He said he got a contract with Soren, a French trade association, and that the factory is expected to open before the end of 2022.

Home energy platform

Branch Energy based in Houston announcement $ 4.5 million in seed funding for its green energy supply and home energy improvement advisory services. He plans to enroll his first clients in Texas this fall.

This round of funding was led by Comcast Ventures with participation from Global Founders Capital, Inovia Capital and Assaf Wand, CEO of Hippo Unicorn Home Insurance.

Branch was co-founded by Alex Ince-Cushman, ex-Palantir and former nuclear fusion researcher; Daniel MacDonald, a serial B2C entrepreneur; and Todd Burgess, an energy industry veteran. The trio will use the funds to expand the team and support the development of the data and analytics infrastructure that powers the company’s offering.

Branch will first enter deregulated energy markets in the United States, where homeowners can choose their energy suppliers. It will offer renewable energy contracts, acting as a platform for invoicing, payment and customer service, while also offering advice on the installation and financing of smart energy devices.

Branch delves deep into the details for its customers, combining energy consumption data, satellite imagery, hyper-local weather forecasts and AI to calculate the economic benefits a homeowner can expect to reap from every device for owners. The branch also coordinates financing and installation.

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