Nuclear Reactors – ABWR http://abwr.org/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 19:04:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://abwr.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Nuclear Reactors – ABWR http://abwr.org/ 32 32 Energy Secretary visits INL with focus on clean energy, national security capabilities https://abwr.org/energy-secretary-visits-inl-with-focus-on-clean-energy-national-security-capabilities/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 18:02:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/energy-secretary-visits-inl-with-focus-on-clean-energy-national-security-capabilities/ IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (KIFI) — U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Jennifer Granholm made her first visit to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on Wednesday. Granholm, a former governor of Michigan, was nominated by President Joe Biden to head the Department of Energy and confirmed by the US Senate. She is the 16th in the […]]]>

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (KIFI) — U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Jennifer Granholm made her first visit to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on Wednesday.

Granholm, a former governor of Michigan, was nominated by President Joe Biden to head the Department of Energy and confirmed by the US Senate. She is the 16th in the natione energy secretary.

Granholm met with INL staff, including Director John Wagner, who briefed the secretary on an initiative to reduce INL’s carbon emissions to net zero by 2031.

The secretary toured major research facilities at the 890 square mile INL site and the Idaho Falls campus. She also received updates on clean energy and national security projects, including advanced nuclear reactor demonstrations planned for the INL site in the coming years.

“INL’s research on clean energy and national security will be key to delivering on this administration’s promise to make energy more secure, affordable, reliable, and resilient for all Americans,” Granholm said. “INL is at the forefront of emerging technologies, like advanced nuclear reactors, to harness the carbon-free nuclear power that will be essential to meeting President Biden’s climate goals. After my first in-person visit to INL, I am confident that the brilliant minds here are securing our clean energy future and solidifying our country’s place as a world leader in science and innovation.

Granholm toured several facilities within INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex, including those involved in nuclear fuel research, vital to efforts to develop and deploy advanced nuclear reactors.

She toured the EBR-II dome, a historic site being reconfigured to house a US Department of Defense nuclear reactor demonstration project. Granholm was briefed on this project, as well as two other nuclear reactor demonstrations under development at the INL site.

“As the National Nuclear Energy Research and Development Laboratory, we were especially pleased to share our progress with the Secretary as we work to bring the first three advanced reactor demonstration projects into service at our site over the course of for the next three years,” Wagner said.

Granholm was briefed on clean energy research being conducted at INL’s Energy Systems Laboratory, including the integration of nuclear and intermittent renewable energy sources, electric vehicle battery testing, bioenergy and advanced manufacturing.

Granholm also visited the Cybercore Integration Center, which brings together INL expertise and Idaho university students and faculty to help educate and train the future cybersecurity workforce.

“It was a real pleasure to host Secretary Granholm,” Wagner said. “His leadership and passion for INL’s clean energy and national security missions is truly inspiring.”

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TVA moves forward with smaller nuclear reactor projects to achieve carbon-free goal https://abwr.org/tva-moves-forward-with-smaller-nuclear-reactor-projects-to-achieve-carbon-free-goal/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 01:02:11 +0000 https://abwr.org/tva-moves-forward-with-smaller-nuclear-reactor-projects-to-achieve-carbon-free-goal/ Nearly four decades after the Tennessee Valley Authority abandoned construction of more than half of the nuclear power plants it once planned to build, the federal utility is moving forward again with plans to pursue the next generation of ‘nuclear energy. The federal utility said Tuesday it has an agreement with a nuclear manufacturer to […]]]>

Nearly four decades after the Tennessee Valley Authority abandoned construction of more than half of the nuclear power plants it once planned to build, the federal utility is moving forward again with plans to pursue the next generation of ‘nuclear energy.

The federal utility said Tuesday it has an agreement with a nuclear manufacturer to pursue the design of a small modular reactor at the Clinch River reactor site near Oak Ridge and will spend the next year preparing a possible building permits to build a few 300 megawatt reactors. .

TVA Chairman Jeff Lyash said smaller nuclear reactors such as the GE-Hitachi BWRX-300 being studied by TVA can be built more cost-effectively and offer more flexibility than previous generation nuclear power plants. Lyash said that as TVA pursues a range of energy options for its future, he believes small modular reactors will be needed to help TVA achieve its long-term goal of being carbon-free by 2050 while maintaining a reliable and relatively inexpensive power supply. .

“I am pleased to announce that TVA has taken another step down this path (towards the construction of a small modular reactor) and has signed a bipartisan agreement with GE-Hitachi that will support our planning and preliminary licensing for the potential deployment of an SMR (small modular reactor) at the Clinch River site,” Lyash said during a presentation of the results on Tuesday. “The agreement will provide additional information to analyze the viability of SMRs in the Valley. “

In the quarterly earnings report, TVA revealed that the board of directors this spring ratified the approval of a programmatic approach to explore the design of the GE-Hitachi reactor “in collaboration with other utilities, agencies governments, research institutes and organizations on advanced nuclear technologies”.

TVA and Ontario Power Co., the largest utilities in the United States and Canada, negotiated a bilateral contract with General Electric and Hitachi to develop and build the GE Hitachi BWRX-300. Lyash said TVA was targeting the fourth quarter of 2023 or the first quarter of 2024 to submit a construction permit application for the design of the smaller reactor, which could be built as early as 2030.

TVA’s latest move is part of a plan adopted by the board in February allocating up to $200 million to explore and develop the GE Hitachi BWRX-300 reactor design. The GE Hitachi model is one of more than two dozen small reactor designs under development.

Staff File Photo / The Tennessee Valley Authority building in Chattanooga is shown in 2016.

Lyash said the 300-megawatt size and light-water design of the GE Hitachi plan “matches the scale, load growth and decarbonization plans” the board set out when adopting its plan. diet plan in 2021.

“The BWRX-300 is an ideal technology solution for TVA because it views small modular reactors as a carbon-free source of generation,” Sean Sexton, executive vice president of advanced nuclear at GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy, said in a statement. . Tuesday.

But some environmental groups are questioning TVA’s latest quest for more nuclear power, noting that most of the 17 reactors that TVA first proposed to build more than half a century ago have finally been shut down. scrapped due to cost overruns or other issues. TVA is the nation’s third-largest nuclear power operator, with seven reactors at its Sequoyah, Watts Bar and Browns Ferry nuclear plants. But 10 other reactors proposed by TVA were never completed even though TVA spent more than $10 billion on the abandoned plants.

“It’s quite frustrating to see TVA chasing after unproven technologies with no known costs like SMRs – or still wanting to build more natural gas production – while they lag behind in adopting proven, cost-effective technologies like solar.” , Stephen Smith, executive director of the Southern Clean Energy Alliance, said in a telephone interview on Tuesday.

Smith said TVA already gets more than 40% of its electricity from nuclear units, but the federal utility lags behind most of its neighbors in the share of solar and wind generation used to generate electricity. In the second quarter, 21% of TVA’s electricity came from natural gas plants, and TVA is proposing to build more gas plants to replace some of the coal generation it is shutting down.

TVA has pledged to shut down the last of 59 coal units it once operated by 2035 to help reduce its carbon emissions and aid President Joe Biden’s call to decarbonize the US electric grid.

Lyash said TVA is pursuing a new and diverse generation portfolio to ensure a reliable and resilient power system, and he is looking forward to exploring and expanding solar generation, battery storage, pumped hydro generation, advanced hydrogen technologies and other carbon-free energy production.

Last month, TVA announced it was seeking proposals for up to 5,000 megawatts of carbon-free power in one of the largest carbon-free generation applications in the country.

“But I think to meet the increased demand we expect for electricity, and to do so in a reliable, resilient, cost-effective and clean way, we need to consider a new nuclear generation,” Lyash said.

TVA was the first utility to obtain an early site permit to build up to 800 megawatts of nuclear power generation from small modular reactors at its Clinch River site in Oak Ridge. By a 3-to-1 vote, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission voted in 2019 to issue TVA a 20-year site license for the 935-acre site as an acceptable location for TVA to potentially construct and operate small modular reactors.

TVA is pursuing a two-step authorization process to proceed with a construction permit to build the new units and then later obtain an operating permit to operate the reactors.

“We are developing this construction license application, which we will make a decision to submit (to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission) in the fourth quarter of 2023 or the first quarter of 2024,” Lyash said.

The commission would have up to two years to review and decide on the building permit application. Lyash said the Oak Ridge project should serve as a model for other small modular reactors that TVA could also build at former coal-fired power plant sites or at the abandoned Bellefonte nuclear plant site in Alabama.

The decision to eventually build a small modular reactor will still require the approval of TVA’s board of directors and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

In its Tuesday financial report, TVA said it spent $98 million on work on small modular reactors, including work to complete the first site permit application for the Clinch River nuclear site. The US Department of Energy, which operates the Oak Ridge National Laboratory near the Clinch River site, is a partner in some of the research on the project and has reimbursed $29 million to TVA.

“Additional expenses will be determined based on the future development of the project,” TVA said in its financial filing.

Contact Dave Flessner at dflessner@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6340. Follow him on Twitter at @dflessner1.

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US, Japan continue trade diplomacy to counter China, says Tokyo envoy https://abwr.org/us-japan-continue-trade-diplomacy-to-counter-china-says-tokyo-envoy/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 09:18:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/us-japan-continue-trade-diplomacy-to-counter-china-says-tokyo-envoy/ By David Dolan and Yukiko Toyoda TOKYO (Reuters) – Chips, batteries and energy are key areas of collaboration between the United States and Japan as allies seek to secure supply chains and counter China, the government said. sent from Washington to Tokyo. Former Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel has focused on ‘trade diplomacy’ since taking over […]]]>

By David Dolan and Yukiko Toyoda

TOKYO (Reuters) – Chips, batteries and energy are key areas of collaboration between the United States and Japan as allies seek to secure supply chains and counter China, the government said. sent from Washington to Tokyo.

Former Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel has focused on ‘trade diplomacy’ since taking over as US ambassador this year, pushing for trade ties in areas that have broader significance for economic security.

A U.S. firm is now eyeing a “potential major investment” related to chips in Japan, in what would mark the latest collaboration between the countries on semiconductors, Emanuel told Reuters in an interview.

He declined to elaborate or give a timeline.

Political cartoons about world leaders

“Commercial diplomacy is an important part of overall economic collaboration and coordination between the United States and Japan,” Emanuel said Monday.

The two countries agreed on Friday to establish a new joint research center for next-generation semiconductors.

Japan has announced it will provide up to 92.9 billion yen ($700 million) to help US-based Western Digital Corp and its partner Kioxia Holdings ramp up memory chip production at a Japanese factory.

Meanwhile, Tesla supplier Panasonic Holdings Corp last month chose Kansas as the site for a new battery factory. That deal was reached, Emanuel said, after U.S. President Joe Biden spoke with Panasonic executives in Japan.

The cooperation comes as China has used its economic might to pressure other countries, Emanuel said.

“There’s a pattern here: if they don’t like what you say politically, they put muscle on you economically,” he said, citing Japan’s experience more than a decade ago. when Beijing restricted rare earth export quotas after a territorial dispute.

In a joint statement on Friday, ministers from the United States and Japan said they opposed “economic coercion”, although they did not name any specific country.

However, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said at a press briefing that “the People’s Republic of China’s coercive and retaliatory economic practices are forcing countries into choices that compromise their security, intellectual property, economic independence”.

China has repeatedly said that it never uses economic coercion against any country and firmly opposes any form of coercion politically and diplomatically. He accused Washington of engaging in economic coercion in the name of national security.

Emanuel said if a country comes under pressure from China, the United States must counter with “economic incentives,” including using energy resources as a “strategic asset.”

Japan, the world’s largest LNG buyer, is a growing market for US natural gas. Between 2018 and 2021, Japanese imports of US LNG more than doubled, according to Japanese government data. Advanced nuclear reactors known as small modular reactors (SMRs) are another area of ​​collaboration.

Emanuel declined to say whether Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi, who began a tour of Asia on Monday, would visit Taiwan, the self-governing island claimed by Beijing.

Concerns over Chinese tensions with Taiwan, which makes the vast majority of sub-10 nanometer semiconductors used in smartphones, have prompted countries like the United States and Japan to step up investment in chip production.

Emanuel said there must also be more investment in training skilled workers to support the chip industry.

“We both need to invest in more scientists, engineers and workers to achieve this,” he said.

(Reporting by David Dolan and Yukiko Toyoda; Additional reporting by Yuka Obayashi; Editing by Alexander Smith)

Copyright 2022 Thomson Reuters.

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US regulators to certify first small nuclear reactor design https://abwr.org/us-regulators-to-certify-first-small-nuclear-reactor-design/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 22:20:12 +0000 https://abwr.org/us-regulators-to-certify-first-small-nuclear-reactor-design/ Enlarge / The NuScale Box Reactor. NuScaleName On Friday, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) announced it would issue certification to a new nuclear reactor design, making it the seventh to be approved for use in the United States. But in some ways it’s a first: The design, from a company called NuScale, is a small […]]]>
Enlarge / The NuScale Box Reactor.

NuScaleName

On Friday, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) announced it would issue certification to a new nuclear reactor design, making it the seventh to be approved for use in the United States. But in some ways it’s a first: The design, from a company called NuScale, is a small modular reactor that can be built in a central facility and then moved to the site where it will be operated.

The move was expected after the design received approval during its final safety assessment in 2020.

Small modular reactors were promoted as avoiding many of the problems that made large nuclear power plants extremely expensive to build. They are small enough that they can be assembled in a factory and then shipped to the site where they will operate, eliminating many of the challenges of custom building on site. Additionally, they are structured to allow passive safety, where no operator action is required to shut down the reactor in the event of a problem.

Many of the small modular designs involve different technology from traditional reactors, such as using molten uranium salts as reactor fuel. NuScale has a much more traditional design, with fuel and control rods and energy carried in boiling water. Its unmanned safety features include placing the entire reactor in a large pool of water, control rods inserted into the reactor by gravity in the event of a power outage, and convection cooling from an external water source.

NuScale started the certification process in 2016. According to the NRC, this process required the company to submit technical information for the Commission to assess it as follows:

Applications should closely analyze the appropriate design response to accidents or natural events. Applications should also indicate the inspections, tests, analyzes and acceptance criteria that will verify the construction of key design features. In addition, the NRC also requires applicants for design certification to assess how the designs protect the reactor and spent fuel pool from the effects of a large commercial aircraft impact.

Upon completion, certification is published in the Federal Register, allowing the design to be used in the United States. Friday’s announcement indicates that the NRC is ready to take the plunge into publication.

The NRC will still have to weigh on the sites where one of these reactors is deployed. Currently, one such site is in the works: a project called the Carbon Free Power Project, which will be located at the Idaho National Lab. This should be operational in 2030, but has faced some financial uncertainty. Utilities likely to use the electricity generated there are reluctant to commit money to the project.

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US chooses test plant for advanced nuclear reactor fuel https://abwr.org/us-chooses-test-plant-for-advanced-nuclear-reactor-fuel/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 17:31:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/us-chooses-test-plant-for-advanced-nuclear-reactor-fuel/ WASHINGTON, July 27 (Reuters) – The U.S. Department of Energy said on Wednesday it had selected a design to build a multibillion-dollar nuclear test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory that could help develop fuels for advanced nuclear reactors. The Multipurpose Test Reactor, or VTR, was proposed in 2018 by the Trump administration, and if […]]]>

WASHINGTON, July 27 (Reuters) – The U.S. Department of Energy said on Wednesday it had selected a design to build a multibillion-dollar nuclear test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory that could help develop fuels for advanced nuclear reactors.

The Multipurpose Test Reactor, or VTR, was proposed in 2018 by the Trump administration, and if Congress provides funding, it would be the first fast nuclear test reactor to operate in the United States in nearly three decades. .

Backers say it would allow US companies to conduct advanced technology and fuel tests without having to travel to competitors in Russia and China.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

The department plans to use the innovative small module of the GE Hitachi nuclear power reactor as the basis for the design of the VTR.

“The VTR project would help modernize America’s nuclear energy research and development infrastructure and significantly accelerate technology development for current and next-generation reactors,” the Department of Energy said. the design of the sodium-cooled fast reactor.

Reuters in 2019 reported on internal Department of Energy documents revealed by a freedom of information request from the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) that showed the cost of VTR could be 3.9 billion to $6 billion, up to 40% more than a US official estimated earlier this year.

Ed Lyman, nuclear security expert at UCS, said the current cost could be even higher with current inflation, supply chain and labor constraints.

A DOE spokesperson did not comment on the cost estimate.

“The DOE has no plans to build the VTR until Congress grants us funding to move forward,” the person said.

The department requested $45 million in the fiscal year 2023 budget for the VTR, which would likely use uranium, plutonium and zirconium as fuel.

The Biden administration believes nuclear power is essential to meeting the president’s climate goals of decarbonizing the electric grid by 2035 and the broader economy by 2050.

But a fuel likely to be used in high-tech reactors, called high-dosage low-enriched uranium, or HALEU, with uranium enriched up to 20%, is mainly produced in Russia.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Reporting by Timothy Gardner; Editing by Barbara Lewis and Mark Porter

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Will renewable energies destabilize the grid? Yale 360 ​​has the answer. https://abwr.org/will-renewable-energies-destabilize-the-grid-yale-360-has-the-answer/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 22:46:28 +0000 https://abwr.org/will-renewable-energies-destabilize-the-grid-yale-360-has-the-answer/ A recent issue of Yale 360 tackles the lies, distortions and half-truths that surround the question of whether renewables can provide a reliable source of electricity at all times or whether they require “base load” thermal generation capacity to be reliable. We all vividly remember the so-called governor of Texas foaming at the mouth after […]]]>

A recent issue of Yale 360 tackles the lies, distortions and half-truths that surround the question of whether renewables can provide a reliable source of electricity at all times or whether they require “base load” thermal generation capacity to be reliable. We all vividly remember the so-called governor of Texas foaming at the mouth after a severe cold snap knocked out that state’s power grid in 2021. He blamed the problem on the state having too much renewable energy.

Amory Lovins, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University and co-founder of the Rocky Mountain Institute, debunks these misconceptions with a tool that’s freely available to everyone: data. He uses it to explode 3 myths about renewable energy and the network.

Myth #1: A grid based on renewable energy is unreliable

Lovins says the metric most often used to describe network reliability is the average duration of power outages experienced by each customer over the course of a year, a metric known as the Average Outage Duration Index. of the system or SAIDI, Germany is often cited as an example of a country with an unstable grid. It gets about half of its electricity from renewables. Yet its grid is one of the most reliable with an SAIDI of just 0.25 hours in 2020. The United States, where renewables and nuclear power each provide around 20% of electricity, had a five times that of Germany, i.e. 1.28 hours in 2020.

Since 2006, the share of renewable energy in Germany’s electricity production has almost quadrupled, while its rate of blackouts has been cut by almost half. Similarly, the Texas grid has become more stable, with its wind capacity increasing sixfold between 2007 and 2020. Today, Texas generates more wind power – about one-fifth of its total electricity – than any other state in the United States. Data shows that renewables increase grid reliability, despite what the oil and gas lobby would have us believe.

Myth #2: Fossil fuels are needed to stabilize the grid

Once again, the data belies this popular myth. Between 2010 and 2020, German generation from fossil fuels decreased by 130.9 TWh and nuclear generation decreased by 76.3 TWh. These decreases were offset by 149.5 TWh of renewable energy. An additional 38 TWh were saved through energy saving strategies. As we saw above, through all these changes, the network in Germany has become more stable, not less. By 2020, Germany’s greenhouse gas emissions had fallen by 42.3% from their 1990 levels, exceeding the 40% target set in 2007. Carbon dioxide emissions from the sector alone of electricity increased from 315 million tonnes in 2010 to 185 million tonnes in 2020.

In Japan, following multiple reactor meltdowns in Fukushima, more than 40 nuclear reactors have shut down permanently or indefinitely without significantly increasing fossil fuel generation or greenhouse gas emissions, Lovins reports. Electricity savings and renewables make up for almost all of the loss, despite policies that have removed renewables.

Myth #3: Renewables cannot meet demand 24/7

It’s a favorite topic of the Fake News crowd and a disgraced ex-president and it’s pure grade A baloney. Lovins points out that ALL production sources are offline at times, either due to weather emergencies or due to routine maintenance. None works all day, every day, all year. All sources of electrical power will be unavailable at some time.

Network managers have to deal with this reality, just as they have to deal with fluctuating demand. The influx of greater amounts of renewable energy does not change this reality, although the way it handles variability and uncertainty changes.

Hydropower fluctuates with the amount of water available. Coal and methane supplies are not 100% reliable. Many outages in Texas in 2021 were caused by the refusal to start diesel generators used by power pipelines. French nuclear facilities were shut down for an average of 96.2 days in 2019 due to “scheduled” or “forced” unavailability. This figure rose to 115.5 days in 2020. After a blackout in the northeastern states of the United States in 2003, sudden shutdowns of nuclear generators left nine reactors producing almost no energy. electricity for several days. Many took two weeks to return to full production.

Modern network operators (except in Texas where network operations are based on ideology rather than data) emphasize diversity and flexibility rather than nominally “baseload” generation sources. stable but less flexible. Diversified renewable portfolios do not fail as massively, sustainably, or unpredictably as large thermal power plants. All thermal power plants are offline 7 to 12 percent of the time, Lovins says.

The mission of a grid

The purpose of a power grid is not just to transmit and distribute electricity based on fluctuations in demand. It must also manage the intermittency of traditional fossil and nuclear power plants. Similarly, the grid can quickly back up wind and solar variations with other renewables, a task that has become easier with more accurate forecasting of weather conditions and wind speeds. This, in turn, enables better forecasting of the production of various renewable energy sources.

Local or on-site renewables are even more resilient because they largely or entirely bypass the grid, where nearly all blackouts begin. Modern power electronics have run South Australia’s billion watt grid on just sun and wind for days, with no coal, no hydro, no nuclear and just the production of natural gas from 4, 4% required by the network regulator. The Hornsdale battery provided by Tesla played an important role in making this possible.

Battery Bypass

Energy storage, whether through batteries, compressed air, hydropower or other means, is a common topic in Clean Technica. There is a general belief that the transition to renewable energy depends on it. But there are other, less expensive, carbon-free ways to handle variable renewables besides giant batteries, suggests Lovins.

The first and most important is energy efficiency, which reduces demand, especially during peak usage times. Buildings that are more efficient need less heating or cooling and change their temperature more slowly so they can run longer on their own thermal capacity and thus maintain comfort with less energy, especially during periods peak.

A second option is demand flexibility or demand response, which allows utility companies to compensate customers who reduce the amount of electricity they use when called upon. This usually happens automatically and imperceptibly. New technologies such as smart circuit breaker panels can allow this to happen automatically with little noticeable effect on customers. Many internet EV chargers can also adjust the amount of electricity they provide or move charging times to off-peak hours when demand on the grid is low.

A recent study found that the United States has 200 gigawatts of cost-effective load flexibility potential that could be realized by 2030. In fact, recent power outages in California highlight the need for a demand response, prompting the California Public Utilities Commission to create the Emergency Load Reduction Program to build on previous demand response efforts.

Another option for stabilizing the grid as renewable energy production increases is diversity, both geographical and technological – onshore and offshore wind, solar panels, solar thermal, geothermal, hydro pumping, municipal waste burning, industrial or agricultural. There are even new ideas like vertical bifacial solar panels and offshore floating solar to complement renewable energy portfolios. The idea is simple: if one of these sources, in a place, does not produce electricity at a given time, there is a good chance that others will.

Vehicle-to-grid technology could become an important part of the grid stabilization process. Ford is already seeing renewed interest in V2G as it has teamed up with Sunrun to promote the idea to drivers of its F-150 Lightning electric pickup truck. Simulations show that ice-storage air conditioning in buildings as well as smart charging to and from the grid by electric vehicles could allow Texas to use 100% renewable electricity in 2050 without the need no storage battery.

Even Europe, famous for its cold, dark winters, may only need storage for a few weeks, based on the experience of several German and Belgian utility companies. It’s a much more feasible challenge than many fossil fuel enthusiasts like to believe.

Takeaway meals

The bottom line is simple, says Lovins. “Electricity grids can process much larger fractions of renewable energy at no or modest cost. Some European countries with little or no hydropower already get between half and three-quarters of their electricity from renewables with better network reliability than in the US. It’s time to get past the myths. Amen to that. Let the data do the talking, not the harbingers of doom who are primarily concerned with lining their own pockets, the environment be damned .


 

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EDF to redesign UK’s flagship nuclear reactors after China shutdown https://abwr.org/edf-to-redesign-uks-flagship-nuclear-reactors-after-china-shutdown/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/edf-to-redesign-uks-flagship-nuclear-reactors-after-china-shutdown/ The power company charged with driving Britain’s nuclear revolution must overhaul the design of its flagship new reactor to avoid a repeat of the fuel rod damage that forced a unit in China to close. EDF plans to prevent malfunctions in the future by modifying the support of the rods. It is also investigating potential […]]]>

The power company charged with driving Britain’s nuclear revolution must overhaul the design of its flagship new reactor to avoid a repeat of the fuel rod damage that forced a unit in China to close.

EDF plans to prevent malfunctions in the future by modifying the support of the rods. It is also investigating potential changes involving cooling waters to alleviate the problem.

The French public company is building the UK’s first nuclear power station for a generation, Hinkley Point C, in Somerset. It is also in advanced talks with the government on the development of a second station, Sizewell C, in Suffolk.

Both reactors use new EPR technology developed by EDF which was first deployed at a Taishan plant in China, developed with its partner China General Nuclear.

One of the plant’s two reactors is still shut down after being taken out of service last July due to fuel damage, less than three years after it was commissioned. Chinese regulators are believed to be reviewing plans to restart the unit.

EDF and its EPR reactor designs are coming under increasing scrutiny as governments scramble to find new sources of clean energy and reduce their dependence on Russian gas.

A second EPR opened in March in Olkiluoto, Finland, more than 10 years behind schedule, while a third EPR in Flamanville, France is also heavily delayed.

A Hinkley Point C spokesperson said the issue with the fuel assemblies at Taishan had been “investigated and understood”.

She said: “A detailed solution has been identified by Framatome and will be implemented for Hinkley Point C and Sizewell C.

“We are confident this will be effective as it is based on a detailed understanding of the problem and operational experience from existing power stations including Sizewell B in Britain.

“[…] As a prudent operator, we will investigate all potential alternative mitigation measures and share this information with the nuclear regulator.

A spokesman for Britain’s Office of Nuclear Regulatory (ONR) said it had been in regular contact with counterparts in France, Finland and China over the Taishan issues.

He added: “The knowledge gained from this issue will be used to inform ONR regulation of nuclear power stations in the UK, such as Hinkley Point C, where the EPR reactor will be installed.

“As we expect from any licensee, all options are being considered to meet Taishan’s operational experience and any new proposals for change, submitted to the ONR, would be rigorously evaluated by ourselves in due course before that any approval be granted for them to be implemented.”

The ONR said there was “more than enough time” for EDF to make changes to Hinkley based on lessons from Taishan.

Hinkley Point C is not expected to start production in June 2027. Last week, EDF said it had asked for leeway in its subsidy contract in the event of a further delay.

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Nuclear Fission vs Fusion – How These Energy Sources Differ https://abwr.org/nuclear-fission-vs-fusion-how-these-energy-sources-differ/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 01:49:53 +0000 https://abwr.org/nuclear-fission-vs-fusion-how-these-energy-sources-differ/ Clean, sustainable nuclear power may sound like a failed post-war dream, but the modern reality of this energy source is far more complicated. On the one hand, nuclear energy in the coming decades will include not only nuclear fission – the type of reaction that already powers nuclear power plants – but also the far […]]]>

Clean, sustainable nuclear power may sound like a failed post-war dream, but the modern reality of this energy source is far more complicated. On the one hand, nuclear energy in the coming decades will include not only nuclear fission – the type of reaction that already powers nuclear power plants – but also the far more elusive nuclear fusion.

If scientists can solve the remaining puzzle pieces behind these technologies, nuclear fission and fusion are poised to have a big impact on the world’s energy reserves and green energy efforts in the decades to come. come. But before they do, let’s set the record straight on the real difference between these two similar-sounding power sources.

Nuclear fission

When you think of nuclear energy, chances are you imagine a process called nuclear fission. To create nuclear fission, atoms of radioactive elements like uranium are shattered with neutrons to release huge amounts of energy. Inside nuclear reactors, this energy is used to create steam, which in turn powers a turbine to generate electricity.

While nuclear fission may be less damaging to the environment than burning oil or coal, this energy source has faced its own crises in the form of radioactive waste pollution and fatal plant meltdowns. aging electricity like Chernobyl and Fukushima. As a result, public opinion on nuclear power in the United States still remains lukewarm today, according a 2022 Pew research survey.

However, it may still be too early to count nuclear fission. In recent years, advances have been made in both the materials (e.g. molten salt instead of cooling water) and the machine learning software built into these plants, making them safer than their predecessors. Additionally, dedicating large complexes to nuclear power plants may become less popular as small modular reactors (SMRs) and microreactors emerge.

From the size of a shipping container to a jet engine, these smaller-scale reactors are designed to be more agile than traditional nuclear power plants. For this reason, it may be easier in the future to operate an SMR in a remote community to create sustainable energy or to power a spacecraft using a microreactor. Companies like NuScaleName, Terra Power and X-Energy are already working hard to bring these possibilities to life.

nuclear fusion

Unlike its sibling, nuclear fusion has been largely confined to the realm of science fiction until recently. Instead of breaking something apart, nuclear fusion occurs when light atoms are smashed together to create a heavier atom (for example, two hydrogen atoms combine to form a helium atom). This interaction creates a huge burst of energy that is still burning at the heart of stars all over the universe.

Unlike fission, nuclear fusion also has the added benefit of being self-sustaining without creating harmful waste. However, achieving and controlling fusion has been much more difficult for scientists to decipher than fission.

One of the problems facing fusion technology is that in order to create self-sustaining energy (a point called “fusion ignition”), it must be ignited by a massive amount of energy. In theory, after this initial power surge, the fusion reactor should then be able to create and sustain even more power than was initially injected into it. However, getting there is easier said than done.

That said, labs like the US National Ignition Facility (NIF) and France’s International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) have made progress in recent years, with the NIF reporting last summer that their reactor was capable to generate up to 70 percent of its input energy. Startups like Helion Energy are also working towards this goal using magnetic coils to compress the reactor core.

Scientists have been claiming to be on the verge of cracking nuclear fusion for decades, but hopefully that promise may finally come true.

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Floating Power Plant Market to Grow at a Stunning CAGR of 11.4% During the Forecast Period 2022-2032 https://abwr.org/floating-power-plant-market-to-grow-at-a-stunning-cagr-of-11-4-during-the-forecast-period-2022-2032/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 10:27:00 +0000 https://abwr.org/floating-power-plant-market-to-grow-at-a-stunning-cagr-of-11-4-during-the-forecast-period-2022-2032/ Floating Power Plant Market Floating Power Plants Market – Analysis, Outlook, Growth Trends and Forecasts NEWARK, DELAWARE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, July 20, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — In 2022, the floating power plant market is expected to be worth US$10.5 billion. It is expected to grow at a staggering CAGR of 11.4% from 2022 to 2032, […]]]>

Floating Power Plant Market

Floating Power Plants Market – Analysis, Outlook, Growth Trends and Forecasts

NEWARK, DELAWARE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, July 20, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — In 2022, the floating power plant market is expected to be worth US$10.5 billion. It is expected to grow at a staggering CAGR of 11.4% from 2022 to 2032, reaching an estimated value of US$17.3 billion. The coming years are expected to see an increase in sales of floating power plants due to rising energy efficiency standards and increased energy consumption.

The existence of floating power began with the introduction of large general purpose electric transportable barges during World War II. Floating power plant is also known as power barges. It is a specially designed vessel in which a real power station is installed to supply electricity to the areas required in the maritime sector. The term floating power station is used, because the power station floats together with the platform on water bodies. Usually, a floating power plant is an existing ship or a marine vessel on which a power plant is installed for the purpose of generating electricity.

Floating power stations are not self-propelled and are a ready-to-use electricity generating unit that can be plugged into the ship’s networks if required. Unpowered floating power plant vessels are known as power barges or barge mounted power plants and they have power plants installed on the deck barge. Floating power plants can be equipped with multiple or single gas turbines, gas and reciprocating diesel engines, nuclear reactors and boilers for power generation.

The adoption rate or scope of usage of the floating power station is expected to increase in the coming years due to factors such as it is mobile and can be moved from one place to another very easily, it is easier to relocate and sell/trade the floating plant, it can quickly supply power to areas with partial infrastructure, the system is not affected due to earthquakes or floods, it does not require a great site, among others.

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Floating Power Plant Market Dynamics:

The floating power plant market is expected to grow over the estimated period owing to the increase in demand for power generation in the global market. Floating power plants offer many advantages in the market. First, the floating power plant can be built at the shipyard or in a factory, eliminating the need to set up a special construction site for it. Moreover, a lot of costs can be saved for location analysis which includes the cost of field studies and its environment.

In addition, the floating power plant has a very low impact on the environment and the problem of dismantling is also eliminated because it can be carried out in the nearest shipyard or at a dedicated site. The oceanic environment nevertheless makes it essential to take into account a few factors, such as the need to ensure that under no circumstances do radioactive materials spill into the sea and access for personnel and equipment.

Some of the factors driving the global floating market are growing demand for electricity in addition to lack of power infrastructure, efficient power generation, high efficiency, growing demand for clean energy and advantages over conventional onshore power plants. These factors will propel the demand for floating power plants in the global market during the forecast period. Several countries around the world openly accept floating power plants, as the aforementioned advantages make them the most attractive tool for power generation in the global market.

For example, the world’s first floating nuclear power plant is being built by Russia in St. Petersburg at the Baltiysky Zavod shipyard. The site where the operation is taking place is also known as Akademik Lomonosov and contains two naval reactors (KLT-40C) with a capacity of 35 MW. They rode on a barge 30 meters wide and 144 meters long. The operation is scheduled for 2017 in the Chukotka district in northwestern Russia. Hence, the global floating power plant market is expected to grow with a significant CAGR during the forecast period.

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Floating power plant: regional outlook:

Asia-Pacific is estimated to account for the leading share of the floating power plant market owing to the rising production and demand for power generation in countries like China, Japan, countries in the of ASEAN and India by 2028. The floating power plant market in Europe and North America is assessed to grow owing to stringent safety standards and environmental control rules in these regions.

Population growth coupled with increasing disposable income in Latin America and MEA region is expected to be one of the major drivers for the floating power plant market in the near future. Endless demand for productive, reliable, cost-effective and efficient power generation systems such as floating power plant is estimated to propel the floating power plant market over the coming years.

Floating power plant: key players

• Wartsila
• MAN Diesel & Turbo SE
• Upsolar
• Burmeister & Wain Scandinavian Contractor A/S
•Mitsubishi Corporation
• Siemens AG
• Idiot
• A/S floating power station
• Kyocera Corporation
• SeaTwirl AB
• Principle Power, Inc.
• Caterpillar, Inc.
• Vikram Solar Pvt., Ltd.
• Heaven & Earth International
• Solar Yingli
• General electricity company

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Floating Power Plants Market Segmentation:

By origin:
• Non-renewable
• Gas turbines
• Integrated circuit motors
• Renewable
• Solar
• Wind

By capacity:
• Below 5.0MW
• 0MW to 20MW
• 0MW to 100MW
• 0MW to 250MW
• Above 250MW

By type:
• Ships
• Houseboats
• Others (Platforms. Etc.)

By region:
• North America
• Latin America
• Western Europe
• Eastern Europe
• APEJ
• Japan
• Middle East and Africa

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About Future Market Insights (IMF)
Future Market Insights (ESOMAR certified market research organization and member of the Greater New York Chamber of Commerce) provides in-depth insights into the driving factors that increase demand in the market. It reveals opportunities that will drive market growth in various segments on the basis of source, application, sales channel, and end-use over the next 10 years.

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WA Energy Northwest interested in Curio recycled nuclear fuel https://abwr.org/wa-energy-northwest-interested-in-curio-recycled-nuclear-fuel/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 18:58:57 +0000 https://abwr.org/wa-energy-northwest-interested-in-curio-recycled-nuclear-fuel/ Richmond, WA Energy Northwest of Richland is the first commercial nuclear power producer to sign up to potentially buy recycled nuclear fuel from Curio, a small startup. Today, other countries, like France, with nuclear energy programs recycle used nuclear fuel, but not the United States. Instead, nuclear fuel is removed from commercial power plants after […]]]>

Energy Northwest of Richland is the first commercial nuclear power producer to sign up to potentially buy recycled nuclear fuel from Curio, a small startup.

Today, other countries, like France, with nuclear energy programs recycle used nuclear fuel, but not the United States.

Instead, nuclear fuel is removed from commercial power plants after several years of use and stored until the nation has a national repository for it.

Curio, based in Washington, DC, plans the first plant in the country to recycle used nuclear fuel from commercial nuclear power plants to produce new nuclear fuel, as well as other products.

Recycling low-enriched uranium fuel “would represent a game-changing development for the future of commercial nuclear power,” said Bob Schuetz, CEO of Energy Northwest.

Energy Northwest owns and operates the Columbia Generating Station, just north of Richland, Washington. It is the only commercial nuclear plant in the Northwest.

Outside the plant, on a concrete slab in a secure area, are 54 concrete and steel drums – each 19 feet high and 11 feet in diameter – containing spent fuel from the commissioning. factory service in 1984.

The used nuclear fuel was supposed to be taken to a national repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. But with no intention of pursuing this project, the United States continues to search for a site for a repository of spent nuclear fuel from all commercial power plants in the country as well as nuclear reserve fuel from Hanford.

“Yesterday’s nuclear waste is holding back tomorrow’s reactors,” said Edward McGinnis, Curio’s chief executive and former acting deputy secretary for nuclear power at the Department of Energy for 2½ years.

The nation now has nearly 95,000 tons of spent nuclear fuel with no future and about 2,200 tons are added each year.

Energy Northwest alone has paid $100 million in royalties since 1983 to the DOE for the pending national disposal of spent fuel.

Opponents of nuclear power often cite the lack of a disposal site for spent nuclear fuel in the country as a reason for not increasing production.

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Energy Northwest’s Columbia Generating Station near Richland, Wash., is the Northwest’s only commercial nuclear power plant. Timothy J. Park Courtesy of Columbia Power Plant

“This is a great opportunity…to reduce the footprint of spent fuel,” said Jason Herbert, senior director of external strategy for Energy Northwest.

It also demonstrates the nuclear industry’s long-term commitment to sustainability and environmental stewardship, Schuetz said.

Only about 4% at most of the energy value of commercial nuclear fuel is used by the time it is removed from reactors, McGinnis said.

“We really think used fuel is a potential asset in the future,” Herbert said.

Curio plans to remove more than uranium from spent fuel in commercial reactors.

More plans for spent fuel

It is also pursuing plans to eliminate isotopes for medical use. Radioactive isotopes have medical uses ranging from cancer treatments to imaging.

Drums for Web.jpg
Energy Northwest has 54 concrete and steel storage cylinders stored near Richland, Washington, to hold spent fuel from the Columbia power plant. Courtesy of Power Northwest

There are also deletion opportunities for other isotopes used by industry, used to power deep space missions and which could eventually be useful for new fission-based batteries.

McGinnis estimates that at least 96% of the highly radioactive material in the spent fuel would be removed for useful purposes.

And unlike the processes used at the Hanford site just north of Richland to chemically separate plutonium for the country’s nuclear weapons program, large amounts of waste would not be generated by the Curio process, he said. declared.

Energy Northwest also sees an opportunity with Curio to reduce the nation’s reliance on fuel from foreign sources.

Some American commercial power plants have used uranium from Russia, although the Columbia power plant is not one of them.

“The more that supply chain and those resources can be based domestically, the more secure that supply chain is,” Herbert said.

One of the reasons the United States has not recycled nuclear fuel is the fear of nuclear proliferation.

McGinnis said the Curio process will have the strongest possible proliferation barriers. Plutonium that could be used for weapons would remain mixed with highly radioactive materials as a self-protection measure, he said.

Curio, which has not yet chosen a site for its fuel recycling plant, estimates that its plant could be operational in 12 years.

With Energy Northwest as an early partner, recycled fuel will be optimized for its fuel needs, McGinnis said.

Energy Northwest is now interested in fuel for the Columbia power plant, if the Curio process proves successful, but McGinnis said Curio will also produce recycled fuel for new advanced nuclear reactors.

In 2021, Energy Northwest signed an agreement with X-energy and Grant County PUD to develop, build, and operate an advanced nuclear reactor on land leased by Energy Northwest from Hanford.

This story was originally published July 18, 2022 11:58 a.m.

Related stories from the Tri-City Herald

Senior Writer Annette Cary covers Hanford, energy, environment, science and health for the Tri-City Herald. She was a journalist for over 30 years in the Pacific Northwest.

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