Nuclear power plants will be the first to benefit from a faster planning system amid the energy crisis

Nuclear plants will be the first to benefit from a faster planning system amid an energy crisis as the minister tries to halt projects whose costs are skyrocketing due to inflation

  • Nuclear power plants and offshore wind farms will benefit from a fast-track system
  • This decision is designed to reduce the time required for the approval of major projects
  • It will cover major projects of national importance such as nuclear reactors

Nuclear power plants and offshore wind farms will benefit from an accelerated planning system to help deal with the energy crisis.

Leveling Up Secretary Greg Clark yesterday unveiled proposals to speed up the review process for so-called ‘nationally significant infrastructure’.

The move aims to reduce the time needed to approve major projects that have suffered years of delays in the past.

It will cover major projects of national importance, such as nuclear reactors, major roads, new runways and large offshore wind farms.

Mr Clark said: ‘Especially in times of high inflation, things need to be done faster, otherwise the costs of major infrastructure projects will rise.’

Nuclear power plants and offshore wind farms will benefit from an accelerated planning system to help deal with the energy crisis

“These changes will help deliver new infrastructure more quickly, speeding up the planning process that often moves too slowly.”

Sources said the proposals could see the time needed to approve a large offshore wind farm reduced from four years to just one.

The new system will not affect the public’s right to oppose new infrastructure projects, which are already subject to a dedicated planning process.

But sources said the existing six-step process would be accelerated to cut costs and deliver benefits faster.

Leveling Up Secretary Greg Clark yesterday unveiled proposals to speed up the review process for so-called 'nationally significant infrastructure'

Leveling Up Secretary Greg Clark yesterday unveiled proposals to speed up the review process for so-called ‘nationally significant infrastructure’

Boris Johnson has set a target of approving the construction of one new nuclear power station a year this decade in a bid to reduce reliance on imported power.

Ministers hope to sign off on the approval of the Sizewell C reactor in Suffolk by tomorrow to coincide with a major energy speech the Prime Minister is planning.

Speaking to reporters yesterday, the Prime Minister said the public ‘wants to know we are going to have a long-term UK energy security strategy’.

He added: “And we are. We put more nuclear. You’ll hear more about that later this week. And we’re also putting in tons of wind power.

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